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The Web 2.0 revolution promises to be just as important a driver of productivity growth as automation was in the 19th and 20th centuries
 
Corporate bureaucracies are on their way to extinction. A new organisational form is emerging that will break down walls and bring people together, and in doing so, capture new opportunities and develop innovative solutions.

This statement – repeated often as Web 2.0 evangelists preach that corporate adoption of social media tools will trigger an e-ruption of creativity, innovation and productivity at work – was actually made just over 40 years ago by Alvin Toffler in his groundbreaking book, Future Shock. In the intervening decades, one thought leader after another has made similar predictions.

Toffler’s forecasts – about how information technology would soon revolutionise knowledge management in organisation – never lived up to their hype in the 1970s or 80s. That, however, didn’t stop Jim Maxmin, CEO of Thorn EMI, from proclaiming at the end of the 1980s: “In the last decade, excellence in business meant doing one thing well. In the decade to come, you will have to do everything well, and do it everywhere. The image of the corporation as a pyramid is dead. The new corporation will be more like a hologram, with shared information making each person, each part, contain the whole.”

The future has finally arrived. What’s different this time around is that a broader consensus seems to be forming. Web technology has crossed a tipping point and is now truly global and on the verge of becoming accessible to all. What’s more, companies are finally beginning to realise this: following initial foot-dragging, many are now actively embracing Web 2.0 tools. In a recent McKinsey survey, more than two-thirds of respondents admitted to using social media tools in their companies. The revolution, it seems, is finally happening. But revolutions can be as disruptive as they are empowering. To quote Tapscott from Wikinomics: “The new participation (brought about by Web 2.0 adoption) will also cause great upheaval, dislocation and danger for societies, corporations and individuals that fail to keep up with the relentless change.” Clearly, if the e-revolution is indeed happening, then executives urgently need to rethink how they structure, organise and manage their companies. Their success in doing so will determine whether their companies ride the crest of the revolution or are swept away by it.

Towards the Networked Enterprise
The broad adoption of social media tools has the potential to unleash a huge transformation in the way companies operate, resulting in a wide range of benefits including enhanced collective knowledge and greater innovation. Following are four key ways in which Web 2.0 tools are transforming organisations.

Increased collaboration: In its report, McKinsey found that when companies incorporate social media across the organisation, “information is shared more readily and less hierarchically, collaboration across silos is more common, and tasks are more often tackled in a project-based fashion.” This should not come as a surprise. One of the major benefits of the networked structure is that it increases information sharing within-and-among disparate departments and divisions.

A democracy of talents: Deployed across organisations, Web 2.0 software constructs open-ended platforms on which, in theory, everyone is equal. Employees working in such a setting are much more likely to openly share ideas and information exclusively for the benefit of the organisation as a whole – something that is rare in hierarchical organisations.
 
A culture of trust: With the rise of Web 2.0-enabled corporations, workers at all levels of the organisation have a much greater say in the day-to-day running of the company, while also enjoying the benefits of a culture of transparency. This, in turn, engenders stronger feelings of loyalty and trust amongst employees. Sadly, many companies still seem to have an instinctive fear of social media in the workplace. In a 2011 study by Robert Half Technology, more than one out of three CIOs surveyed said that their firms did not allow employees to use social networking sites such as Facebook or Twitter. Some employees are even getting sacked when caught logging onto social networking sites at work. Such blind resistance to social media adoption – while understandable – is not only counterproductive, but also highly risky.

Potential productivity gains: While many companies view social media as a ‘time sink’, the reality is that tools such as blogs, wikis and RSS feeds offer the potential to significantly increase productivity – as was shown by two separate studies by MindLab and the University of Melbourne. The latter research found that productivity increases 9% among employees who are able to access the Internet for fun during work. Ironically, the managers who dismiss MySpace, Twitter and Facebook as a waste of time are frequently the same people who themselves waste valuable time with pointless meetings. Even in the face of such widespread disapproval, employees in most organisations are still managing to regularly access their favourite social networking sites; if they can’t log on via their computer, they will simply connect through their smartphones. A recent study found that 76% of respondents visited Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter at least once a day. What’s more, much of this social networking activity was work-focused, with many employees reportedly using their social networks to showcase their companies, which builds brand recognition and supports organisational goals, from recruiting to sales. All of which begs the question: if social networks can be deployed for a company’s greater benefit, why isn’t everyone rushing to e-mpower their employees?

For more articles, Click on IIPM Article

Source : IIPM Editorial, 2013

An Initiative of IIPMMalay Chaudhuri and Arindam chaudhuri (Renowned Management Guru and Economist).

For More IIPM Info, Visit below mentioned Links

2012 : DNA National B-School Survey 2012
Ranked 1st in International Exposure (ahead of all the IIMs)
Ranked 6th Overall

Zee Business Best B-School Survey 2012
Prof. Arindam Chaudhuri’s Session at IMA Indore
IIPM IN FINANCIAL TIMES, UK. FEATURE OF THE WEEK
IIPM strong hold on Placement : 10000 Students Placed in last 5 year
IIPM’s Management Consulting Arm-Planman Consulting
Professor Arindam Chaudhuri – A Man For The Society….
IIPM: Indian Institute of Planning and Management
IIPM makes business education truly global
Management Guru Arindam Chaudhuri
Rajita Chaudhuri-The New Age Woman
IIPM B-School Facebook Page
IIPM Global Exposure
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IIPM Links
IIPM : The B-School with a Human Face
IIPM makes business education truly global
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For some time now, concerned consumers and ad-watchers have been getting increasingly worried about the frat crossing boundaries and hitting erogenous zones where even angels (should, but no longer?) fear to tread! Holding up the Lux Cozy and Amul Macho ads as earlier examples apart from the tons of sexist deodorant ads and of course the scores of whitening creams, they continue to remain anxious, often protesting vehemently against the way the Persuasion Industry is trying to seduce the impressionable, unguarded and aspirational sections of our mahaan Bharat into promising them a more fulfilling, confident and rewarding life if they embrace the products advertised. In its effort to keep pace with India’s ever changing profile and fashionable definition of an ancient civilisation, which is also a young and modern nation, are the ad guys getting a bit too carried away and overdoing it by adventurously crossing the Lakshman Rekha and touching areas best left untouched? Or are we, due to traditional conditioning, being a little too touchy and forgetting that this is year 2012, and the blitz and exposure of new-age media to a techno-savvy youngistan renders this a non-issue?

A new TVC along the skin-lightening-product segment for a product called Clean & Dry Intimate Wash even promises Indian women protection, freshness (and most importantly) fairness “down there”! The commercial shows a young couple relaxing in their house. The man is shown reading a newspaper while the attractive wife – or whoever! – pouts, unhappy at being ignored. Reason? Her dark-coloured privates! Providence steps in, in the form of Clean & Dry Intimate Wash, ostensibly whitening the parts that seemed to have earlier cast a shadow over the guy’s inner view of the young lady and bingo, suddenly aal izz well! Pout disappears, break-up averted, newspaper flung aside to (undoubtedly) explore and enjoy some real whitening-strikes moments!

There’re too many questions that hit one when such an advertising hits the ceiling. Where do we stand on such in-the-face ads? Isn’t there an LoC that the product’s positioning is crossing? But then, how is such a product expected to be launched or marketed? One possibly cannot expect a simple word-of-mouth campaign, can one? And if the product is legal, then why have any hassles on the marketing of such a product? Are we going through the same wave of astonishment that one saw years ago when condoms were marketed in a savvy manner by Kamasutra as opposed to the politically correct yet moribund manner in which Nirodh was advertised?

When invited to comment, political journalist Mahua Chatterjee admits she’s tempted “to laugh hysterically so that she may not weep!” She soon gets serious and unleashes a series of posers. “Who are these guys creating these ads or manufacturing these products? Clearly a lot of us are totally disconnected from their radar! Is this their professional version of marketing which decrees: find a gap and fill it? In their drive to sell a product, is nothing sacred, safe or out of bounds? In the crazed rush to grab eyeballs, is titillation of any kind permissible? What about social responsibility, good taste, style & class?” questions Mahua. Then, tongue-in-cheek, the journo enquires why despite a zillion face-whitening products for men “nothing like Intimate Wash has been dedicated to their, er, penile space?”
 
Actress Moon Moon Sen, after a hearty laugh, offers discrete perspectives. “Sometimes, some ads – even if uncomfortable – are necessary. We live in a society where women (mothers & daughters) don’t always know about a lot of stuff, and doctors or professionals who do, hesitate to communicate these facts, due to mental conditioning, rendering them taboo. Unfortunately, many of these are necessary for a woman’s well-being. However, a vaginal whitening cream doesn’t remotely come in that category and does strain the imagination! A douche or cream for infection is understandable but...”

While documentary filmmaker Ishani Dutta finds the ‘intent’ of the TVC “inappropriate and sexist”, 23-year-old copywriter Tanu Koundal can’t stop laughing! “It’s too funny... I know that India is very whiteness crazed and men prefer fair complexioned wives, but it’s the face and body on display that is seen and reacted upon... not the private parts!” says Tanu. But the young lady also believes that this kind of advertising – edgy, weird and hitting no-man’s-land – is a part and parcel of today’s permissive, sexually-cool society where nothing is a big deal anymore. But isn’t the product strengthening the unfortunate fairness orientation of Indians and fortifying racist paradigms?

For more articles, Click on IIPM Article

Source : IIPM Editorial, 2013

An Initiative of IIPMMalay Chaudhuri and Arindam chaudhuri (Renowned Management Guru and Economist).

For More IIPM Info, Visit below mentioned Links

2012 : DNA National B-School Survey 2012
Ranked 1st in International Exposure (ahead of all the IIMs)
Ranked 6th Overall

Zee Business Best B-School Survey 2012
Prof. Arindam Chaudhuri’s Session at IMA Indore
IIPM IN FINANCIAL TIMES, UK. FEATURE OF THE WEEK
IIPM strong hold on Placement : 10000 Students Placed in last 5 year
IIPM’s Management Consulting Arm-Planman Consulting
Professor Arindam Chaudhuri – A Man For The Society….
IIPM: Indian Institute of Planning and Management
IIPM makes business education truly global
Management Guru Arindam Chaudhuri
Rajita Chaudhuri-The New Age Woman
IIPM B-School Facebook Page
IIPM Global Exposure
IIPM Best B School India
IIPM B-School Detail

IIPM Links
IIPM : The B-School with a Human Face
IIPM makes business education truly global
IIPM B-School Facebook Page
IIPM Global Exposure
Planman Technologies
IIPM B-School Detail
IIPM: Selection Process
IIPM: Research and Publications
IIPM MBA Institute India

IIPM Contact Info

IIPM History
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Rohit Ohri, Executive Director, Dentsu India Group talks to 4Ps B&M about how he plans to make the company’s work culture more creative and lively
 
When Rohit Ohri joined Dentsu India, he instantly realised that changing the fortune of the company was not going to be a cakewalk. However, by setting a priority-led plan, he’s been able to fulfil most of the tasks he set out to accomplish in the first year. We find out what he has in mind for the future.

Profit margins are going down tremendously in the industry. How are you tackling it?
While it is true that there is a lot of squeeze in the revenues of the agencies, what actually confronts the agencies, and this is a question for every agency in the market, is looking at broadening your scope of services. It’s not about what you were doing or the services you have been providing, but what you really need to see is where the consumer is going tomorrow and what services and connections can we have with the consumer tomorrow. That is why I say that mobile is the next big thing. If we were to look at mobiles as they are right now, then we would say that there is no revenue in it and you should junk it. But we need to be forward facing. What is important is understanding where the consumer is going and be there ahead of everybody else. This way, the clients, seeing that the agency is able to foresee the future trends of communication would find a reason to partner with us.

So the way forward is to find newer ways of servicing clients and hence generating revenues, rather than sticking with what you have and then cribbing about losing revenues.

The ad industry is known for its high attrition rates and critical shortage of talent. How do you plan to deal with it at Dentsu?
If we look at more proactive ways of looking at a talent, and even before the talent begins to think that he is stagnating or that he is doing his best, you give him another opportunity or you give him a new business to handle so that you can keep a constant sense of growth in that talent’s life and the way he is looking at his career. Everyone we have here with us has a vision of where they see their career growing and the organisation must be able to shake hands with that, because if the organisation is providing you the opportunity to actually do what will help your career grow, it is the fundamental reason why a talent stays with an organisation. Otherwise, people tend to move on because the organisation is not fulfilling their aspirations.

Being a Japanese entity, how beneficial or challenging has it been when it comes to roping in new clients as well as sustaining previous ones?
If you look at it, a Japanese entity runs in the front in almost all categories today, be it be automotives or electronics. And that has been a huge advantage for us as it really helped us build a base as a group in India. The other thing is the way advertising is really developing with the coming in of new age technology, and this new technology needs to be integrated with communications as the mobile media and the digital media are not traditional or non-traditional communication mediums. Nowadays, it’s not online or offline but rather through the line and it’s more of integrated communication. And this is something in which Japan is way ahead of the others and to my mind, this is a great opportunity for us to look at this next paradigm of communication and bring in the learnings from Tokyo to India.
 
When you joined Dentsu last year, what key problems was the agency suffering from in your view?
As an agency, the big challenge we have is to not be known in the market as a Japanese agency. We are owned by a Japanese MNC, but the fact is that in India, we want to be known as the agency with the best skills and capabilities in the market. We want to build an agency, which is as competitive and capable as the best there is in the industry. It’s not about working with Dentsu because you have the comfort zone of it being a Japanese agency. We need to be competitive in the industry and for that, we need the best people, the best skills and the best capabilities. We are actively identifying ways to change the game on every parameter and on every service delivery that we make to the client.

What do you feel is better for an advertising agency – a structured, orderly setup or a free flowing casual environment?
We are in the business of creating ideas and what we produce comes out of the mind, so to my understanding, whether the agency is organised or not is not of as much importance as whether the agency is creative. That, to me, is the most important thing. The creative culture to me is something, which not just the creative guys; but also the planning people, the account managers and every single person of the organisation are aware of and feel empowered by. That is what I have been trying to create over here. I don’t want to create a bank where people come on time and leave on time, I want to create an agency where good creative work can be done.

For more articles, Click on IIPM Article

Source : IIPM Editorial, 2013

An Initiative of IIPMMalay Chaudhuri and Arindam chaudhuri (Renowned Management Guru and Economist).

For More IIPM Info, Visit below mentioned Links

2012 : DNA National B-School Survey 2012
Ranked 1st in International Exposure (ahead of all the IIMs)
Ranked 6th Overall

Zee Business Best B-School Survey 2012
Prof. Arindam Chaudhuri’s Session at IMA Indore
IIPM IN FINANCIAL TIMES, UK. FEATURE OF THE WEEK
IIPM strong hold on Placement : 10000 Students Placed in last 5 year
IIPM’s Management Consulting Arm-Planman Consulting
Professor Arindam Chaudhuri – A Man For The Society….
IIPM: Indian Institute of Planning and Management
IIPM makes business education truly global
Management Guru Arindam Chaudhuri
Rajita Chaudhuri-The New Age Woman
IIPM B-School Facebook Page
IIPM Global Exposure
IIPM Best B School India
IIPM B-School Detail

IIPM Links
IIPM : The B-School with a Human Face
IIPM – FLP (Flexi Learning Program)
IIPM : The B-School with a Human Face
IIPM makes business education truly global
IIPM B-School Facebook Page
IIPM Global Exposure
Planman Technologies
IIPM B-School Detail
IIPM: Selection Process
IIPM: Research and Publications
IIPM MBA Institute India

IIPM Contact Info

IIPM History
IIPM Think Tank
IIPM Infrastructure
IIPM Info
 
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