Global trading has been a way of life for hundreds, if not thousands of years, but it is only recently that the environmental and social implications of global sourcing decisions are being taken more seriously
 
Global trading has been a way of life for hundreds, if not thousands of years, documented by legendary tales like the travels of the explorer Marco Polo or the Silk Road, one of the world’s oldest and historically important trade routes. However, the scale and pace of change of global trade has changed dramatically in the last half century. Figures from the World Trade Organisation (WTO) show that since 1950, world trade in manufactured products has increased 50-fold, reaching a total of $10,500 billion in 2008. If commodities such as fuels, minerals and agricultural products are included, the total trade figure exceeds $15,000 billion.

Trends in global trading are the result of independent decisions taken by businesses around the world looking for sources of competitive advantage. However, these decisions have consequences, not just hidden costs but sustainability implications, which are often unaccounted for. A recent study conducted by Cranfield aimed to address this problem by looking at how companies make global sourcing decisions and how they analyse the costs, risks and sustainability implications of such decisions. The study included 15 case studies from seven different industries which included: retail, electronics, aerospace, fashion, mechanical equipment, oil & gas. The case studies allowed us to look in-depth at the processes used by organisations when conducting sourcing decisions, and allowed a comparison of the practices in different industries to be made.

It was clear from the research that in most cases the primary motivation for global sourcing was to reduce costs by relocating production to low labour cost countries. However, the definition of ‘cost’ was somewhat limited – often only including the purchase price, transportation and customs duties. The use of the ‘Total Cost of Ownership’ (TCO) concept whereby all supply chain costs, risk costs and transaction costs are included was conspicuous by its absence. Even more evident was the lack of consideration of the impact that global sourcing might have on greenhouse gas emissions and on social issues such as child labour, working conditions and living wages. This blinkered and short-term view is also at odds with the concept of sustainability which is defined as the ability to meet the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.

It is almost always the case that global sourcing will result in longer pipelines than the local or regional equivalent. Apart from the cost of financing the additional inventory that extended pipelines require, the likelihood of disruptions to the flow is increased. It is paradoxical that in an era of ‘just-in-time’ the typical lead-times for re-ordering and replenishment of goods and materials have increased as a result of global sourcing. In light of this, it is perhaps surprising that the use of formal supply chain risk management procedures in the context of global sourcing decisions is not the norm. Our research identified that more often than not, the potential impact of sourcing decisions on supply chain continuity is not formally considered.

Growth in global trade and the associated increase in transportation is contributing to higher emissions of greenhouse gases, particularly carbon dioxide. Alarmingly few organisations participating in the study had a clear understanding of the environmental implications of their decisions. However, it was evident that awareness of environmental issues was increasing and that companies were putting more time and resources into understanding and managing the environmental impact of their operations
 
There is now a growing realisation that in the not-too-distant future, organisations and even individuals will probably have to pay for the carbon impact of their activities. For the business sector, this penalty may take the form of taxes, levies or the capping of allowable emissions under carbon trading regimes. These additional costs could bring the commercial viability of their operations into question. For any organisation, it is not just the carbon impact of its in-house activities that needs to be understood but rather the total carbon effect of its wider supply chain.

With the current trend to off-shore sourcing continuing rapidly, the implications for total carbon impact are significant. To understand the true carbon footprint of a supply chain for any product requires the ability to conduct a ‘through life’ analysis of the emissions generated from cradle to grave. What is the total environmental cost from raw material sourcing through manufacturing and distribution to consumption and disposal?

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Source : IIPM Editorial, 2013

An Initiative of IIPMMalay Chaudhuri and Arindam chaudhuri (Renowned Management Guru and Economist).

For More IIPM Info, Visit below mentioned Links

2012 : DNA National B-School Survey 2012
Ranked 1st in International Exposure (ahead of all the IIMs)
Ranked 6th Overall

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IIPM’s Management Consulting Arm-Planman Consulting
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The Web 2.0 revolution promises to be just as important a driver of productivity growth as automation was in the 19th and 20th centuries
 
Corporate bureaucracies are on their way to extinction. A new organisational form is emerging that will break down walls and bring people together, and in doing so, capture new opportunities and develop innovative solutions.

This statement – repeated often as Web 2.0 evangelists preach that corporate adoption of social media tools will trigger an e-ruption of creativity, innovation and productivity at work – was actually made just over 40 years ago by Alvin Toffler in his groundbreaking book, Future Shock. In the intervening decades, one thought leader after another has made similar predictions.

Toffler’s forecasts – about how information technology would soon revolutionise knowledge management in organisation – never lived up to their hype in the 1970s or 80s. That, however, didn’t stop Jim Maxmin, CEO of Thorn EMI, from proclaiming at the end of the 1980s: “In the last decade, excellence in business meant doing one thing well. In the decade to come, you will have to do everything well, and do it everywhere. The image of the corporation as a pyramid is dead. The new corporation will be more like a hologram, with shared information making each person, each part, contain the whole.”

The future has finally arrived. What’s different this time around is that a broader consensus seems to be forming. Web technology has crossed a tipping point and is now truly global and on the verge of becoming accessible to all. What’s more, companies are finally beginning to realise this: following initial foot-dragging, many are now actively embracing Web 2.0 tools. In a recent McKinsey survey, more than two-thirds of respondents admitted to using social media tools in their companies. The revolution, it seems, is finally happening. But revolutions can be as disruptive as they are empowering. To quote Tapscott from Wikinomics: “The new participation (brought about by Web 2.0 adoption) will also cause great upheaval, dislocation and danger for societies, corporations and individuals that fail to keep up with the relentless change.” Clearly, if the e-revolution is indeed happening, then executives urgently need to rethink how they structure, organise and manage their companies. Their success in doing so will determine whether their companies ride the crest of the revolution or are swept away by it.

Towards the Networked Enterprise
The broad adoption of social media tools has the potential to unleash a huge transformation in the way companies operate, resulting in a wide range of benefits including enhanced collective knowledge and greater innovation. Following are four key ways in which Web 2.0 tools are transforming organisations.

Increased collaboration: In its report, McKinsey found that when companies incorporate social media across the organisation, “information is shared more readily and less hierarchically, collaboration across silos is more common, and tasks are more often tackled in a project-based fashion.” This should not come as a surprise. One of the major benefits of the networked structure is that it increases information sharing within-and-among disparate departments and divisions.

A democracy of talents: Deployed across organisations, Web 2.0 software constructs open-ended platforms on which, in theory, everyone is equal. Employees working in such a setting are much more likely to openly share ideas and information exclusively for the benefit of the organisation as a whole – something that is rare in hierarchical organisations.
 
A culture of trust: With the rise of Web 2.0-enabled corporations, workers at all levels of the organisation have a much greater say in the day-to-day running of the company, while also enjoying the benefits of a culture of transparency. This, in turn, engenders stronger feelings of loyalty and trust amongst employees. Sadly, many companies still seem to have an instinctive fear of social media in the workplace. In a 2011 study by Robert Half Technology, more than one out of three CIOs surveyed said that their firms did not allow employees to use social networking sites such as Facebook or Twitter. Some employees are even getting sacked when caught logging onto social networking sites at work. Such blind resistance to social media adoption – while understandable – is not only counterproductive, but also highly risky.

Potential productivity gains: While many companies view social media as a ‘time sink’, the reality is that tools such as blogs, wikis and RSS feeds offer the potential to significantly increase productivity – as was shown by two separate studies by MindLab and the University of Melbourne. The latter research found that productivity increases 9% among employees who are able to access the Internet for fun during work. Ironically, the managers who dismiss MySpace, Twitter and Facebook as a waste of time are frequently the same people who themselves waste valuable time with pointless meetings. Even in the face of such widespread disapproval, employees in most organisations are still managing to regularly access their favourite social networking sites; if they can’t log on via their computer, they will simply connect through their smartphones. A recent study found that 76% of respondents visited Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter at least once a day. What’s more, much of this social networking activity was work-focused, with many employees reportedly using their social networks to showcase their companies, which builds brand recognition and supports organisational goals, from recruiting to sales. All of which begs the question: if social networks can be deployed for a company’s greater benefit, why isn’t everyone rushing to e-mpower their employees?

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Source : IIPM Editorial, 2013

An Initiative of IIPMMalay Chaudhuri and Arindam chaudhuri (Renowned Management Guru and Economist).

For More IIPM Info, Visit below mentioned Links

2012 : DNA National B-School Survey 2012
Ranked 1st in International Exposure (ahead of all the IIMs)
Ranked 6th Overall

Zee Business Best B-School Survey 2012
Prof. Arindam Chaudhuri’s Session at IMA Indore
IIPM IN FINANCIAL TIMES, UK. FEATURE OF THE WEEK
IIPM strong hold on Placement : 10000 Students Placed in last 5 year
IIPM’s Management Consulting Arm-Planman Consulting
Professor Arindam Chaudhuri – A Man For The Society….
IIPM: Indian Institute of Planning and Management
IIPM makes business education truly global
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For some time now, concerned consumers and ad-watchers have been getting increasingly worried about the frat crossing boundaries and hitting erogenous zones where even angels (should, but no longer?) fear to tread! Holding up the Lux Cozy and Amul Macho ads as earlier examples apart from the tons of sexist deodorant ads and of course the scores of whitening creams, they continue to remain anxious, often protesting vehemently against the way the Persuasion Industry is trying to seduce the impressionable, unguarded and aspirational sections of our mahaan Bharat into promising them a more fulfilling, confident and rewarding life if they embrace the products advertised. In its effort to keep pace with India’s ever changing profile and fashionable definition of an ancient civilisation, which is also a young and modern nation, are the ad guys getting a bit too carried away and overdoing it by adventurously crossing the Lakshman Rekha and touching areas best left untouched? Or are we, due to traditional conditioning, being a little too touchy and forgetting that this is year 2012, and the blitz and exposure of new-age media to a techno-savvy youngistan renders this a non-issue?

A new TVC along the skin-lightening-product segment for a product called Clean & Dry Intimate Wash even promises Indian women protection, freshness (and most importantly) fairness “down there”! The commercial shows a young couple relaxing in their house. The man is shown reading a newspaper while the attractive wife – or whoever! – pouts, unhappy at being ignored. Reason? Her dark-coloured privates! Providence steps in, in the form of Clean & Dry Intimate Wash, ostensibly whitening the parts that seemed to have earlier cast a shadow over the guy’s inner view of the young lady and bingo, suddenly aal izz well! Pout disappears, break-up averted, newspaper flung aside to (undoubtedly) explore and enjoy some real whitening-strikes moments!

There’re too many questions that hit one when such an advertising hits the ceiling. Where do we stand on such in-the-face ads? Isn’t there an LoC that the product’s positioning is crossing? But then, how is such a product expected to be launched or marketed? One possibly cannot expect a simple word-of-mouth campaign, can one? And if the product is legal, then why have any hassles on the marketing of such a product? Are we going through the same wave of astonishment that one saw years ago when condoms were marketed in a savvy manner by Kamasutra as opposed to the politically correct yet moribund manner in which Nirodh was advertised?

When invited to comment, political journalist Mahua Chatterjee admits she’s tempted “to laugh hysterically so that she may not weep!” She soon gets serious and unleashes a series of posers. “Who are these guys creating these ads or manufacturing these products? Clearly a lot of us are totally disconnected from their radar! Is this their professional version of marketing which decrees: find a gap and fill it? In their drive to sell a product, is nothing sacred, safe or out of bounds? In the crazed rush to grab eyeballs, is titillation of any kind permissible? What about social responsibility, good taste, style & class?” questions Mahua. Then, tongue-in-cheek, the journo enquires why despite a zillion face-whitening products for men “nothing like Intimate Wash has been dedicated to their, er, penile space?”
 
Actress Moon Moon Sen, after a hearty laugh, offers discrete perspectives. “Sometimes, some ads – even if uncomfortable – are necessary. We live in a society where women (mothers & daughters) don’t always know about a lot of stuff, and doctors or professionals who do, hesitate to communicate these facts, due to mental conditioning, rendering them taboo. Unfortunately, many of these are necessary for a woman’s well-being. However, a vaginal whitening cream doesn’t remotely come in that category and does strain the imagination! A douche or cream for infection is understandable but...”

While documentary filmmaker Ishani Dutta finds the ‘intent’ of the TVC “inappropriate and sexist”, 23-year-old copywriter Tanu Koundal can’t stop laughing! “It’s too funny... I know that India is very whiteness crazed and men prefer fair complexioned wives, but it’s the face and body on display that is seen and reacted upon... not the private parts!” says Tanu. But the young lady also believes that this kind of advertising – edgy, weird and hitting no-man’s-land – is a part and parcel of today’s permissive, sexually-cool society where nothing is a big deal anymore. But isn’t the product strengthening the unfortunate fairness orientation of Indians and fortifying racist paradigms?

For more articles, Click on IIPM Article

Source : IIPM Editorial, 2013

An Initiative of IIPMMalay Chaudhuri and Arindam chaudhuri (Renowned Management Guru and Economist).

For More IIPM Info, Visit below mentioned Links

2012 : DNA National B-School Survey 2012
Ranked 1st in International Exposure (ahead of all the IIMs)
Ranked 6th Overall

Zee Business Best B-School Survey 2012
Prof. Arindam Chaudhuri’s Session at IMA Indore
IIPM IN FINANCIAL TIMES, UK. FEATURE OF THE WEEK
IIPM strong hold on Placement : 10000 Students Placed in last 5 year
IIPM’s Management Consulting Arm-Planman Consulting
Professor Arindam Chaudhuri – A Man For The Society….
IIPM: Indian Institute of Planning and Management
IIPM makes business education truly global
Management Guru Arindam Chaudhuri
Rajita Chaudhuri-The New Age Woman
IIPM B-School Facebook Page
IIPM Global Exposure
IIPM Best B School India
IIPM B-School Detail

IIPM Links
IIPM : The B-School with a Human Face
IIPM makes business education truly global
IIPM B-School Facebook Page
IIPM Global Exposure
Planman Technologies
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IIPM: Selection Process
IIPM: Research and Publications
IIPM MBA Institute India

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Rohit Ohri, Executive Director, Dentsu India Group talks to 4Ps B&M about how he plans to make the company’s work culture more creative and lively
 
When Rohit Ohri joined Dentsu India, he instantly realised that changing the fortune of the company was not going to be a cakewalk. However, by setting a priority-led plan, he’s been able to fulfil most of the tasks he set out to accomplish in the first year. We find out what he has in mind for the future.

Profit margins are going down tremendously in the industry. How are you tackling it?
While it is true that there is a lot of squeeze in the revenues of the agencies, what actually confronts the agencies, and this is a question for every agency in the market, is looking at broadening your scope of services. It’s not about what you were doing or the services you have been providing, but what you really need to see is where the consumer is going tomorrow and what services and connections can we have with the consumer tomorrow. That is why I say that mobile is the next big thing. If we were to look at mobiles as they are right now, then we would say that there is no revenue in it and you should junk it. But we need to be forward facing. What is important is understanding where the consumer is going and be there ahead of everybody else. This way, the clients, seeing that the agency is able to foresee the future trends of communication would find a reason to partner with us.

So the way forward is to find newer ways of servicing clients and hence generating revenues, rather than sticking with what you have and then cribbing about losing revenues.

The ad industry is known for its high attrition rates and critical shortage of talent. How do you plan to deal with it at Dentsu?
If we look at more proactive ways of looking at a talent, and even before the talent begins to think that he is stagnating or that he is doing his best, you give him another opportunity or you give him a new business to handle so that you can keep a constant sense of growth in that talent’s life and the way he is looking at his career. Everyone we have here with us has a vision of where they see their career growing and the organisation must be able to shake hands with that, because if the organisation is providing you the opportunity to actually do what will help your career grow, it is the fundamental reason why a talent stays with an organisation. Otherwise, people tend to move on because the organisation is not fulfilling their aspirations.

Being a Japanese entity, how beneficial or challenging has it been when it comes to roping in new clients as well as sustaining previous ones?
If you look at it, a Japanese entity runs in the front in almost all categories today, be it be automotives or electronics. And that has been a huge advantage for us as it really helped us build a base as a group in India. The other thing is the way advertising is really developing with the coming in of new age technology, and this new technology needs to be integrated with communications as the mobile media and the digital media are not traditional or non-traditional communication mediums. Nowadays, it’s not online or offline but rather through the line and it’s more of integrated communication. And this is something in which Japan is way ahead of the others and to my mind, this is a great opportunity for us to look at this next paradigm of communication and bring in the learnings from Tokyo to India.
 
When you joined Dentsu last year, what key problems was the agency suffering from in your view?
As an agency, the big challenge we have is to not be known in the market as a Japanese agency. We are owned by a Japanese MNC, but the fact is that in India, we want to be known as the agency with the best skills and capabilities in the market. We want to build an agency, which is as competitive and capable as the best there is in the industry. It’s not about working with Dentsu because you have the comfort zone of it being a Japanese agency. We need to be competitive in the industry and for that, we need the best people, the best skills and the best capabilities. We are actively identifying ways to change the game on every parameter and on every service delivery that we make to the client.

What do you feel is better for an advertising agency – a structured, orderly setup or a free flowing casual environment?
We are in the business of creating ideas and what we produce comes out of the mind, so to my understanding, whether the agency is organised or not is not of as much importance as whether the agency is creative. That, to me, is the most important thing. The creative culture to me is something, which not just the creative guys; but also the planning people, the account managers and every single person of the organisation are aware of and feel empowered by. That is what I have been trying to create over here. I don’t want to create a bank where people come on time and leave on time, I want to create an agency where good creative work can be done.

For more articles, Click on IIPM Article

Source : IIPM Editorial, 2013

An Initiative of IIPMMalay Chaudhuri and Arindam chaudhuri (Renowned Management Guru and Economist).

For More IIPM Info, Visit below mentioned Links

2012 : DNA National B-School Survey 2012
Ranked 1st in International Exposure (ahead of all the IIMs)
Ranked 6th Overall

Zee Business Best B-School Survey 2012
Prof. Arindam Chaudhuri’s Session at IMA Indore
IIPM IN FINANCIAL TIMES, UK. FEATURE OF THE WEEK
IIPM strong hold on Placement : 10000 Students Placed in last 5 year
IIPM’s Management Consulting Arm-Planman Consulting
Professor Arindam Chaudhuri – A Man For The Society….
IIPM: Indian Institute of Planning and Management
IIPM makes business education truly global
Management Guru Arindam Chaudhuri
Rajita Chaudhuri-The New Age Woman
IIPM B-School Facebook Page
IIPM Global Exposure
IIPM Best B School India
IIPM B-School Detail

IIPM Links
IIPM : The B-School with a Human Face
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IIPM : The B-School with a Human Face
IIPM makes business education truly global
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Hiroshi Omata, COO, Dentsu Marcom

How do you plan to tackle the attrition challenge in India?
Japan is still practising lifetime employment. But it is very different in India. Here, people just come and go. And while it is easy for me to say that I want to stop this trend, it’s actually very difficult to do so. But if I am to do it, then I would give them a lot of opportunities. In the same company, if they can have totally new experiences, then they might want to change their mind & stay on.

How has Sandeep Goyal’s departure affected the agency?
Mr. Goyal created the foundation of Dentsu in India from nothing. I respect him a lot for what he’s done. Without his effort, we would be nothing. What we are doing now is to create on top of that foundation. If I were to start from scratch, it wouldn’t have been easy.

What is better for the growth of an agency’s operation – competition or cooperation?
In the three companies we operate, we have collaboration as well as competition. Obviously, we have competing brands with each of these agencies, so there is a need to have a sense of secrecy and privacy between these companies. But we do also have collaboration between ourselves in the sense that we share the global trends and observations with each other.

For more articles, Click on IIPM Article

Source : IIPM Editorial, 2013

An Initiative of IIPMMalay Chaudhuri and Arindam chaudhuri (Renowned Management Guru and Economist).

For More IIPM Info, Visit below mentioned Links

2012 : DNA National B-School Survey 2012
Ranked 1st in International Exposure (ahead of all the IIMs)
Ranked 6th Overall

Zee Business Best B-School Survey 2012
Prof. Arindam Chaudhuri’s Session at IMA Indore
IIPM IN FINANCIAL TIMES, UK. FEATURE OF THE WEEK
IIPM strong hold on Placement : 10000 Students Placed in last 5 year
IIPM’s Management Consulting Arm-Planman Consulting
Professor Arindam Chaudhuri – A Man For The Society….
IIPM: Indian Institute of Planning and Management
IIPM makes business education truly global
Management Guru Arindam Chaudhuri
Rajita Chaudhuri-The New Age Woman
IIPM B-School Facebook Page
IIPM Global Exposure
IIPM Best B School India
IIPM B-School Detail

IIPM Links
IIPM : The B-School with a Human Face
IIPM – FLP (Flexi Learning Program)
IIPM : The B-School with a Human Face
IIPM makes business education truly global
IIPM B-School Facebook Page
IIPM Global Exposure
Planman Technologies
IIPM B-School Detail
IIPM: Selection Process
IIPM: Research and Publications
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Having undergone a complete overhaul over the last year, the agency is treading new grounds on its big leap ahead; 4Ps B&M gets the inside dope
 
In January last year, when Dentsu Global decided to buy off Sandeep Goyal’s stake in their three advertising companies for a reported sum of Rs.240 crore, it expectedly took adville by storm. To this day, the deal remains one of the biggest stake sales in the advertising industry. And as many industry veterans called the deal highly overpriced, they were also voicing in the same breath that Dentsu had become what it had on the back of Sandeep Goyal only. With an investment of roughly Rs.10 crore from each founder in 2003, the agency reported revenues of Rs.200 crore in the first year of operation itself, which, by the end of 2010, grew to Rs.1,200 crore. So naturally, the exit of Sandeep Goyal could not have been an easy one. Add to that, the agency saw the subsequent & sudden departure of several top management members, creating a huge leadership crisis. But this wasn’t the only setback that the company suffered back then. The buzz within the industry that Dentsu Marcom was losing its creativity was getting stronger. It was possibly for these reasons that many of the existing clients of the agency either put their business open for alternative pitches or did not give them any new brands. With such monumental problems at hand, finding a successor to Sandeep Goyal could not have been an easy task.

However in June 2011, when Rohit Ohri acceded to the position, the ball of change began to roll. Soon after joining the organisation, Rohit quickly ascertained his priorities – to get the right people in the organisation and to enthuse creativity within the existing team. Between June 2011 and now, the agency has been on a hiring spree; both at the top and at the junior levels; having hired over 23 new people from a total of 63 employees, and there are plans to get more. Besides Rohit, the other senior executives including Titus Upputuru, the National Creative Director, Narayan Devanathan, the National Planning Head, Sunita Prakash, Vice President and Harjot Singh Narang, the Delhi Branch head, have all joined the organisation within the last one year, thus forming a completely new management team. However, what was a bigger challenge than forming a new team was the second priority – reinvigorating the creative environment in the organisation. But as the saying goes, when one door closes, another opens up. Something similar happened at Dentsu Marcom too. While the sudden departure of the senior management had left a crater within the agency, it also gave them the option to start afresh and to give the agency a whole new innings.

If you were to visit the agency, there’s little chance that you would be able to sense the turmoil the agency had been through over the past year. The office, done up all in white, has interesting stuff lying around including water guns (unloaded, thankfully), skytrooper masks and African idols. There’s music to add to the melee, with in-office cricket/football available for any employee up for the ask. Clearly, the bigger intent in all this has been to push forward the fun-element into the office environment. Of course, any agency plumping its creative front is expected to embrace a bohemian philosophy. But Dentsu is evidently paying more than lip service to this issue. One big plus from this effort has been that the newly hired top management bonds quite well. In the world of killing office politics, there’s quite some value in the previous statement.
 
Every morning, the three vertical heads, Narayan, Titus and Harjot, huddle up at one of the corner seating areas (note: never inside a cabin) to discuss the latest office affairs. Through this, not only can they easily update each other with the latest developments concerning the agency, but also can set the agenda for the day. For them, this informal chat session – coupled with home cooked food, they insist – is the perfect beginning to the day. It’s an example that they’re trying to set for each and every employee of the agency – about how to be motivated and excited about work, yet not lose the fun, trust and team work quotient.

Did we mention the ice cream vendor with his ‘thela’ whom we crossed paths with on the 10th floor? That’s the kind of impact that hits one in the agency. Every success is celebrated substantially and expansively too. The ice cream vendor, for instance, was part of festivities that were being held on the culmination of an extremely hectic work schedule spanning more than two months, during which period, many of the employees spent several days and nights consecutively in the office to meet some deadline or the other; a consequence of having landed seven crucial deals within a period of four months.

For more articles, Click on IIPM Article

Source : IIPM Editorial, 2013

An Initiative of IIPMMalay Chaudhuri and Arindam chaudhuri (Renowned Management Guru and Economist).

For More IIPM Info, Visit below mentioned Links

2012 : DNA National B-School Survey 2012
Ranked 1st in International Exposure (ahead of all the IIMs)
Ranked 6th Overall

Zee Business Best B-School Survey 2012
Prof. Arindam Chaudhuri’s Session at IMA Indore
IIPM IN FINANCIAL TIMES, UK. FEATURE OF THE WEEK
IIPM strong hold on Placement : 10000 Students Placed in last 5 year
IIPM’s Management Consulting Arm-Planman Consulting
Professor Arindam Chaudhuri – A Man For The Society….
IIPM: Indian Institute of Planning and Management
IIPM makes business education truly global
Management Guru Arindam Chaudhuri
Rajita Chaudhuri-The New Age Woman
IIPM B-School Facebook Page
IIPM Global Exposure
IIPM Best B School India
IIPM B-School Detail

IIPM Links
IIPM : The B-School with a Human Face
IIPM – FLP (Flexi Learning Program)
IIPM : The B-School with a Human Face
IIPM makes business education truly global
IIPM B-School Facebook Page
IIPM Global Exposure
Planman Technologies
IIPM B-School Detail
IIPM: Selection Process
IIPM: Research and Publications
IIPM MBA Institute India

IIPM Contact Info

IIPM History
IIPM Think Tank
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Primary and secondary education form the building blocks of an individual’s career. And when you apply that to the Indian population, this very education acts as the foundation of our economy. India aspires to become an economic powerhouse over the next few decades. But for this vision to materialise, the Indian education system has to undergo radical restructuring. A student typically studies basic subjects throughout his 12 years in school. Subsequently, a candidate wishing to step into a graduate programme, or even a post graduate one after graduation, typically just follows the flow of things than being able to specifically choose an education area that corresponds to his passion or interests.

In all this hit and trial to make something out of a one’s future, the role of education learning centres is almost something akin to the missing link. In the contemporary education business space, education learning centres not only play out the expected traditional role of providing coaching and guidance in terms of various subjects to enable students to clear national entrance exams in the fields of engineering, management, law, medical studies and others, but these learning centres also provide extremely invaluable guidance to the enrolled students in deciding the course or programme that they should be taking up. This becomes quite relevant as more often than not, the education learning centres are the only forums where students are able to honestly ponder over a match between their competence, interests and future career profile. Without doubt, the faculty appointed by such institutes have been long enough in the business to understand subject specific patterns and generate targeted results. Although highly fragmented and regional in nature, these education learning centers have now started attracting PE/VC funding as well. The fact that they are now diversifying into broader disciplines apart from just mainstream only makes for strengthening the idea of education in India. Below is the list of the Top Five Education Learning Centres which are contributing their bit to find the missing links of the Indian education system:
 
Methodology

4Ps B&M, in association with Indian Council for Market Research (ICMR), conducted yet another survey to list the Top 5 Education Learning Centres in the fields of engineering and medicine. The Education Learning Centres were ranked on the basis of study material, mock tests, quality of faculty and their past records. The number of study centres was also taken into consideration for the said study. The peer group at learning centres and the professors on their panel suggested to us their most preferred institutes/learning centre. The top 5 recalled institutes, both in the fields of engineering and medicine, were then collated to arrive at the Top 5 Education Learning Centres in India.

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Source : IIPM Editorial, 2012

An Initiative of IIPMMalay Chaudhuri and Arindam chaudhuri (Renowned Management Guru and Economist).

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Although annual enrolments in higher education have grown steadily at 6.3% over the last decade, the GER (Gross Enrolment Ratio is a statistical measure used by the United Nations to measure education index of a nation) in India still stands at 12.4%, way below the global average of 26% and pathetically low when compared to an average of 36.5% for developing countries. Even the Human Development Index for the year 2011 ranked India at 134, one of the lowest among the League of Nations. This clearly indicates that India requires more institutions to address the issue of accessibility, which is only possible if government encourages entrepreneurs to set up private colleges and universities.

The good news is that, according to a recent report (Private Universities in India: An Investment in National Development) by management consulting group Parthenona, private universities in the country have more than doubled in the last six years. While the country had 20 private universities prior to 2005, that figure surged to 107 last year. However, the bad news is that India still ranks one of the lowest in terms of number of universities per population. While US has nearly 2,500 universities for a population of about 313 million, India has a little over 350 universities catering to a population of 1.3 billion. Even Germany and UK have over 350 and 125 universities for a population of 80 million and 60 million respectively. Experts estimate that India needs 1,000 universities more and the higher education enrolment ratio to be increased by 20% in the next 10 years, to meet the challenges of country’s development.

This certainly compels the government to make room for non-governmental educational institutions to shoulder this responsibility while, at the same time, increasing its efforts to strengthen and empower the existing universities. And not just government, even educational institutions need to look inward and at the paradigm shifts happening all over the world. Apart from the fact that we are now looking at an increasingly multi-polar global environment and a shift from a single ideology, it is a foregone conclusion that leaders of tomorrow will need a radically different approach as compared to their predecessors. Hence, it is important for educational institutions to realise that they have a critical role to play in building these leaders, and to understand how they can fulfill their role responsibly, as it also links to their own long-term sustainability. Listed below are the “Power Private Universities” and “India’s 25 Most Promising Engineering Colleges” which are imparting high quality education in India. They are providing a professional learning environment that acts as a catalyst not only for the exponential growth of students, but for the country as well.

Methodology:
The Indian Council for Market Research (ICMR) conducted a perception survey to identify Power Private Universities. The survey was conducted amongst education consultants, industry experts and students. The respondents were asked to name and list a few upcoming universities in the country based on course contents, faculty, infrastructure, affiliations and accreditations awarded to them, brand equity and media visibility. Based on these responses, the final list of 15 Power Private Universities was generated.

Apart from Power Private Universities, a separate perception survey was conducted by ICMR amongst engineering students to identify 25 Most Promising Engineering Colleges. Faculty members of esteemed engineering colleges were also interviewed on the parameters of infrastructure, course content and R&D. An overall sample of 250 respondents were covered using a structured questionnaire through telephonic and email techniques. Then, based on the frequency of responses, a list of the 25 Most Promising Engineering Colleges was generated.
 
 
Methodology:
4Ps B&M, in association with the Indian Council for Market Research (ICMR), conducted a pan-India perception survey on the upcoming B-schools. The survey was conducted amongst management students (final year students; sample size of 200) and faculty members (sample size of 20) of several management institutes across the country. The respondents were asked to name one upcoming B-school based on the parameters of infrastructure, placement, packages and industry interface. The frequency of responses helped us to draw a list of the 50 upcoming B-schools in the country which could be the most sought after ones in the near future.
 
 
This year’s survey also included some of India’s most respected industry professionals with wide experience in various sectors and geographies across the globe

Alok Bharadwaj
Senior VP, Canon India

Alok has been the driving force behind sales, marketing, corporate planning & brand building activities of Canon in India for over a decade now. He has successfully led the company towards achieving exponential growth & market leadership in India. At present, he is also the VP of MAIT and a part of the CII’s National Committee for IT & ITeS.
 
Jiby Thomas
Co-founder & VP Marketing, Quickr.com

With a prime focus on developing Internet based transactions for Indian community, Jiby has used his 17 years experience in building a strong e-commerce brand Quikr.com that currently is being accessed by over 25 million users every month.

For more articles, Click on IIPM Article

Source : IIPM Editorial, 2012

An Initiative of IIPMMalay Chaudhuri and Arindam chaudhuri (Renowned Management Guru and Economist).

For More IIPM Info, Visit below mentioned Links

IIPM : The B-School with a Human Face
Zee Business Best B-School Survey 2012
IIPM makes business education truly global
IIPM B-School Facebook Page
IIPM Global Exposure
Planman Technologies
IIPM B-School Detail
IIPM: Selection Process
IIPM: Research and Publications
IIPM MBA Institute India
IIPM Best B School India

Planman Technologies
IIPM Contact Info

IIPM History
IIPM Think Tank
IIPM Infrastructure
IIPM Info

IIPM Links

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