Picture
Stay focused and stay hungry. That’s the mantra Purple Focus has been following the past 16 years, making out-of-the-box creatives and campaigns, which have helped this growing agency win big brands and business
 
An advertising agency, they say, is all about its team and people. Purple Focus, a full service advertising and marketing communication solutions agency based out of Indore and with offices in Delhi and Mumbai as well, comprises a talented pack of people coming from different walks of life. Engineers, photographers, poets, dancers, rock climbers, all make up the quorum at Purple Focus. They bring with them interesting and fresh points of view, which reflect in the work that Purple Focus does for its various clients. The young and energetic team of Purple Focus today comprises of 130 highly motivated professionals who work together in a lively and congenial environment to deliver their best in advertising and integrated marketing communication solutions. The agency’s impressive roster of clients include well-known brands such as Bajaj Auto, Eicher Motors, Nokia, Big Magic, DLF Shopping Festival, Hathway, Next Gen, Shakti Pumps, Banswara Suitings, Patrika, Lohia Sterlinger, IBD Universal, Rotomac Writing Instruments, Promart (discount store chain from Provogue India), Tata Indicom (six circles), Dainik Bhaskar, DB.com, Ruchi Lifescapes & Countywalk among others.

Started in 1996 as a small advertising agency with a team of just four members, Purple Focus has come a long way in establishing its creative foothold in the world of advertising today. The stupendous growth of the company in a short span of time is reflected in all of its accomplishments – a strong infrastructure, sound financial position, technological advancement, a combination of the best creative brains and an experienced client servicing team. Founder & Managing Director Pankaj Acharya and Co-Founder & Director Rahul Vaidya say: “We believe that businesses are built around people and fortunately we have been able to bring on board the right kind of people. What has worked for us is the owner-manager model and thankfully all our partnerships have been successful for us.” Thanks to the agency’s foresightedness in forging and clobbering together enduring partnerships, Purple Focus today boasts of five major associate companies. These are Fusion Events, the arm responsible for creating and hosting events for the agency, Purple Shunya, the digital agency, Purple Spot, Purple Productions, the film production arm and Innovative Ideators, which is into crowdsourcing.

Today, Purple Focus has made it good on the national advertising stage and it counts amongst the top 20 agencies of India. According to Acharya and Vaidya, over the years there has been a conscious effort to promote a definitive culture in the agency – a culture that serves to promote the agency as a breeding ground for good effective advertising ideas! The agency’s long-term vision is to create an eco-system of self-sustaining businesses, which fosters creativity and innovation in bright young people and provides all the possible support, be it knowledge, experience or reassurance in realizing their dreams. Says Acharya, “We are one happy bunch of people having a diverse and rich experience. We have a deep-rooted connect with the street sensibilities and an intuitive understanding of the minds & hearts of India. It is our cultural conditioning, which is the bedrock of our meaningful and results-oriented marketing communication solutions.”
 
Over the years Purple Focus has successfully executed various memorable campaigns that have won the agency many international and national awards. The first major recognition for the agency came when it snapped up gold at the International Summit Creative Award 2003. Based in Portland, USA, the Summit Creative Award is the only competition of its kind which is created to recognize exceptional work by advertising agencies – video production companies, multimedia firms and other creative groups with annual billings of $15 million or less. The competition featured multiple international entries in 17 creative categories, which were judged against a stringent set of standards like originality, creativity of concepts, quality of execution and the ability to communicate and persuade. Purple Focus won gold in the outdoor/transit category for its award winning anti-smoking poster, which drew critical acclaim from one and all. “The credit for the award lay in the design’s simplicity and strength of the concept along with its strong execution,” recalls Acharya adding that the anti-smoking poster was not only noticed and hugely appreciated, but also proved its effectiveness by inspiring many people to quit smoking.

Despite winning critical acclaim, it’s difficult for small agencies to snag big accounts in their initial days. Reminiscing about the past when the agency was looking hard to land a big account in its kitty, Acharya says that the first move entailed moving out of Indore, even though the agency was doing good business there. “But then a market like Indore had its limitations. Delhi was booming by then in the area of advertising, Gurgaon was taking shape and so we thought of exploring the Delhi market.” The move paid off with the agency bagging the Tata Indicom account. “We handled the account in its six circles, and then other accounts came along in quick succession like those for Sprandi Shoes,” says Acharya. With business beginning to flow the agency slowly and steadily grew in Delhi. Some new big accounts added to Purple Focus’s initial success. Within a year of its operation in 1997, the agency bagged the account for Eicher Motors. As Acharya puts it, “Eicher was a big boost for us. Even if plans to make it big in Delhi or Mumbai were not exactly in place at that point in time, there was certainly a clear vision that we are here to give the full range of services that would be no less than a big agency in terms of quality.”

The moment of breakthrough arrived when the agency got to sign the deal, along with Ogilvy & Mather, for handling STAR Plus channel’s fiction shows in 2004-05. The deal provided the impetus to the agency for opening its Mumbai office. “We were associated with STAR when it was ruling the GEC segment, working closely on serials like Kyunki Saas Bhi Kabhi Bahu Thi, Bidai and Ye Rishta Kya Kehlata Hai. We handled the STAR account for about 4 years,” says Acharya. The association with STAR ended in 2009, which came at a not very good time for Purple Focus. Its then creative director Vinod Bhargava, who had for long been associated with the agency quit that year amidst the economic slowdown that was ravaging many industries, including that of advertising.

“It was in 2009 that Vinod quit PF and it was probably not a very good year for us. We did not grow as much as targeted, given that the economic turmoil was at its peak then,” remembers Acharya, who works mainly out of Indore but keeps shuttling between all the three offices.


For more articles, Click on IIPM Article

Source : IIPM Editorial, 2013

An Initiative of IIPMMalay Chaudhuri and Arindam chaudhuri (Renowned Management Guru and Economist).

For More IIPM Info, Visit below mentioned Links

SC slams AICTE's illicit control on MBA courses
MBA, MCA courses no longer under AICTE
2012 : DNA National B-School Survey 2012
Ranked 1st in International Exposure (ahead of all the IIMs)
Ranked 6th Overall

Zee Business Best B-School Survey 2012
Prof. Arindam Chaudhuri’s Session at IMA Indore
IIPM IN FINANCIAL TIMES, UK. FEATURE OF THE WEEK
IIPM strong hold on Placement : 10000 Students Placed in last 5 year
IIPM’s Management Consulting Arm-Planman Consulting
Professor Arindam Chaudhuri – A Man For The Society….
IIPM: Indian Institute of Planning and Management
IIPM makes business education truly global
Management Guru Arindam Chaudhuri
Rajita Chaudhuri-The New Age Woman
IIPM B-School Facebook Page

IIPM Global Exposure
IIPM Best B School India
IIPM B-School Detail

IIPM Links
IIPM : The B-School with a Human Face

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 
 
Picture
Over the years, fevicol has thrived on tvcs that have reflected a subtle sense of humour. The fevicol marine tvc is a repeat. this brand hates watching good ideas die on the vine
 
Think about it. If someone were to ask you to quickly name five brands in the adhesives space in India, in all probability, Fevicol would make it to that list. An ordinary truth for a brand that has dominated the adhesive market in India for more than five decades. Except, this popularity didn’t come that easy. Besides being a brand that found the right buyer segment early on its life cycle, Fevicol has over the past three decades allowed the right quality and volume of advertising-led marketing to build good word of mouth for itself. Any branded product which controls 70%-plus market share in its segment in India has a future. So you’d reckon. But more importantly, such a cash cow is assumed to be many-a-mile short of entering the stagnation stage in its PLC. The Pidilite-owned 53 year-old Fevicol, continues to swagger along like a teenager, while wannabes have struggled and fallen – some were ignored by the carpenter community, while others shrivelled as the heat of competition wore on.

Two years back, Pidilite had extended the brand name Fevicol to launch a waterproof adhesive called Fevicol Marine. Many may not remember it. But so far, the product has been fairly well-received in a niche category. Having given the brand some breathing time, the company is back to increase awareness about it and make Fevicol Marine the top adhesive used in waterproof (ply)wood work and in kitchens across Indian homes. Experts claim that the company has even taken up the challenge to make Fevicol Marine bigger than other brands like Fevikwik and Fevistik, hoping that the act will help boost the parent brand (Fevicol). So what’s new on the table from Fevicol? A brand new TVC.

The TVC reminds the buyer community of Fevicol Marine’s adhesive strength, even in water. The tagline, “Wahi mazboot jod, paani mein bhi,” says it all. Created by Ogilvy & Mather, the TVC (which is scheduled to remain on air for a month starting the third week of September), is a masterstroke from the brand’s creative kitchen that serves a healthy concoction of humour and information. Though the storyline outlines the attraction between opposite genders, Fevicol continues to use emotional appeal in its ads to the bare minimum. Unlike what most Indian advertisers have practised for decades together.

Shot in Jaisamand Lake, Udaipur (Rajasthan), the TVC opens with a man (the protagonist) rowing a boat, filled with furniture (chairs). A Bengali folk song plays in the background. When an old man sitting on the shore asks for a ride, the protagonist refuses, signaling that there is no room on the boat. But when he sees a young lady requesting for help, he changes his mind, kicks a few chairs into the water and offers her a ride. When the woman points to her goat, he makes more space by throwing out more chairs. She finally insists that her haystack be taken too. He empties his boat completely. The final scene of the TVC shows the boatman ferrying the woman, her goat and the haystack, with the chairs (that are tied to the edge of the boat) floating and being pulled by the boat. The ad ends with a voice over, “Fevicol Marine. Wohi mazboot jod, paani mein bhi” [The same strong adhesive bond, even in water].
 
Shooting the ad wasn’t however an easy task, especially due to disruptions caused by strong winds and water current. Says Vivek Verma, VP – Account Management, Ogilvy Advertising, to 4Ps B&M, “The campaign showcases how a man changes his mind immediately after seeing a beautiful girl. There was humour. But the challenge for us was to keep the boat stationary during certain scenes, and also during intervals to allow it to float at a particular angle to get the right shot. We used two to three boats to control the main boat. The Ad-Director, Director of Photography and some crew members were on a catamaran and they too faced challenges due to the ad not being shot on land.”


For more articles, Click on IIPM Article

Source : IIPM Editorial, 2013

An Initiative of IIPMMalay Chaudhuri and Arindam chaudhuri (Renowned Management Guru and Economist).

For More IIPM Info, Visit below mentioned Links

SC slams AICTE's illicit control on MBA courses
MBA, MCA courses no longer under AICTE
2012 : DNA National B-School Survey 2012
Ranked 1st in International Exposure (ahead of all the IIMs)
Ranked 6th Overall

Zee Business Best B-School Survey 2012
Prof. Arindam Chaudhuri’s Session at IMA Indore
IIPM IN FINANCIAL TIMES, UK. FEATURE OF THE WEEK
IIPM strong hold on Placement : 10000 Students Placed in last 5 year
IIPM’s Management Consulting Arm-Planman Consulting
Professor Arindam Chaudhuri – A Man For The Society….
IIPM: Indian Institute of Planning and Management
IIPM makes business education truly global
Management Guru Arindam Chaudhuri
Rajita Chaudhuri-The New Age Woman
IIPM B-School Facebook Page

IIPM Global Exposure
IIPM Best B School India
IIPM B-School Detail

IIPM Links
IIPM : The B-School with a Human Face

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 
 
Picture
4ps B&M presents an in-depth analysis of the india's most valuable brands list for 2012, and the biggest gainers & losers for the year
 
Sectoral break up

Like last year, the FMCG and Auto segments continue to account for a majority of the 4Ps B&M 100 Most Valuable Brands. A total of 41 brands in our 2012 list belong to these two sectors. Consumer durables comes third with a decent 12% share in the industry-wise brand break up.
 
Indian versus foreign brands
Our analysis for this year reveals that Indian brands are fast catching up with their global counterparts. A total of 46 brands in the 4Ps B&M 100 Most Valuable Brands list were Indian while the remaining were global. With home grown brands delivering better value, we might see more Indian brands in next year’s list.

Legacy versus non-legacy brands
Rightly said, if you’re out of sight, you’re out of mind. The Indian consumer seems highly influenced by brands which have been around for a considerably long period of time. Non-legacy brands account for just 20% of the 4Ps B&M 100 Most Valuable Brands.
 
Top gainers (vis-à-vis 2011)
This year, Canon has been the highest gainer appreciating by 19 ranks (from 75 last year to 56 this year). The other brands that have gained in terms of their rankings are Skoda, Philips, Apple, BlackBerry et al. Interestingly, RIM’s Blackberry which joined the 4Ps B&M 100 Most Valuable Brands list last year has jumped by 12 ranks.

Top losers (vis-à-vis 2011)
One brand gains at the cost of another and our list is no different. The most surprising drops however were in the case of Colgate and Lux ranks respectively. Other brands which dropped by 21 ranks include Kingfisher Airlines and Nokia.
 
The letter game
For whatever it’s worth, brand names starting with ‘H’ had been dominating our list for the last few years, and this year was no different. Brand names starting with ‘H’ (followed by ‘C’ and ‘S’) have a strikingly greater presence in the 4Ps B&M 100 Most Valuable Brands list for 2012.

For more articles, Click on IIPM Article

Source : IIPM Editorial, 2013

An Initiative of IIPMMalay Chaudhuri and Arindam chaudhuri (Renowned Management Guru and Economist).

For More IIPM Info, Visit below mentioned Links

SC slams AICTE's illicit control on MBA courses
MBA, MCA courses no longer under AICTE
2012 : DNA National B-School Survey 2012
Ranked 1st in International Exposure (ahead of all the IIMs)
Ranked 6th Overall

Zee Business Best B-School Survey 2012
Prof. Arindam Chaudhuri’s Session at IMA Indore
IIPM IN FINANCIAL TIMES, UK. FEATURE OF THE WEEK
IIPM strong hold on Placement : 10000 Students Placed in last 5 year
IIPM’s Management Consulting Arm-Planman Consulting
Professor Arindam Chaudhuri – A Man For The Society….
IIPM: Indian Institute of Planning and Management
IIPM makes business education truly global
Management Guru Arindam Chaudhuri
Rajita Chaudhuri-The New Age Woman
IIPM B-School Facebook Page

IIPM Global Exposure
IIPM Best B School India
IIPM B-School Detail

IIPM Links
IIPM : The B-School with a Human Face

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 
 
A focus on processes and paying attention to institution building are the key factors when it comes to building durable brands
 
Let’s be clear about one thing even as we swim and drown in the maddening modern day version of the Tower of Babel called mass media – brands as entities are relatively new concepts as compared to democracy and capitalism. In turn, democracy and capitalism as freshly minted babies as compared to the oldest generic brands in the world called religion and God. If you are boning up on marketing principles and the 4 Ps of advertising as an MBA student in 2012, don’t be shocked by the fact that some of the biggest brands that you take for granted as part of your daily life did not exist even 20 years ago. Try Google Search if you don’t believe me! Or chat with your pals using a new app through Airtel or Vodafone! If you are lucky, you might be using an iPad!!

That’s the first lesson we all must imbibe when we sit down to applaud and analyse the most valuable brands: the simple fact that like seasons and fashion, brands come and go. Many go forever. When I was a young journalist in the late 1980s and early 1990s, BPL was arguably the most formidable brand in India when it came to colour television sets. You, the MBA student circa 2012 probably haven’t heard of BPL. Back in the late 1990s, when Internet usage and email were gathering momentum, the hottest brands were Hotmail (remember Sabeer Bhatia?) and Yahoo. I had three Yahoo mail ids and two Hotmail ids. The last time I used my Hotmail id was in 2006 and the last time I used my Yahoo id was in 2008. Who knows? By the time you, the MBA student, become a senior manager, you might confess to something similar about Gmail! The fact is, in this age of rapidly evolving technology, it is but natural for new brands to emerge and many to fade away. But do remember, there will always be a world of brick and mortars – even if you have become a fan of Flipkart! And there will always be a lot of punch in that old proverb called Old is Gold! Some brands in our list of 100 actually go back more than 100 years. Like Tata, Taj Hotels, Pepsi, Coca Cola .... these brands were born when democracy itself was not such a powerful and flawed brand. And the unbelievable thing is that they have endured. Of course, Tata as a brand is both generic and a mother lode. The Tata brand by itself has spawned and sustained many formidable brands like Taj Hotels, Titan, and Voltas, to name a few. Don’t forget, the first Maharajah of post independence India which is now in tatters, Air India, too was a product of the Tata stable. In that respect, the pedigree and durability of the Tata brand is unmatched. No other brand in India – except perhaps SBI and LIC – evokes that kind of trust and comfort level. Well, you could add Godrej and Dabur to that list of old and durable warhorses and perhaps even add Mahindra & Mahindra to that select list. Even the powerhouse Reliance (RIL) would find it difficult to join that hallowed list.
 
Of course, when it comes to stubborn durability, I have two personal favourites in my personal list of valuable brands in India. The first is called the Congress. For almost four decades, pundits have been busy writing epitaphs of India’s ‘Born to Rule’ party. Memory being very short, most of us have forgotten that 2004 was the last Lok Sabha election that the Congress was supposed to fight as a national party. There you go. In contemporary times, the failure of the New Gen hope Rahul Gandhi to deliver electoral victories has once again raised questions about the future of this brand. But I have a sneaking feeling this brand will remain stubbornly durable. Like Thums Up! When Ramesh Chauhan sold out his home made soft drinks empire consisting of Thums Up, Limca and Gold Spot to Coke in the early 1990s, most of us thought it was curtains. Two other home grown cola brands – Double Seven and Campa Cola – were already history. And Coke did stop promoting Thums Up because it was busy selling the most valuable brand on earth Coca Cola. Truly mysterious, but the Indian consumer simply would not give its stubborn love for Thums Up. Coke was forced to resurrect the brand and it is still going great guns even 20 years after its forecasted demise!

There are hundreds and thousands of similar fascinating tales when it comes to the coming and going of brands. But one thing is clear – a focus on processes and paying attention to institution building are the key factors when it comes to building durable brands. Even highly “individualistic” and eccentric brands like Virgin that depend on the flamboyant personality of Richard Branson have to pay homage to processes and institution building. Not many have a doubt that Virgin has a strong chance of remaining a durable brand even after Branson is gone from the scene. And do remember, even mighty entrepreneurs make bloomers when it comes to distinguishing between passing fads and bestsellers. Rupert Murdoch thought he had latched on to an all time classic when he paid an obscene sum to buy the blockbuster bestseller MySpace. Alas, it peeved to be a passing fad.

For more articles, Click on IIPM Article

Source : IIPM Editorial, 2013

An Initiative of IIPMMalay Chaudhuri and Arindam chaudhuri (Renowned Management Guru and Economist).

For More IIPM Info, Visit below mentioned Links

SC slams AICTE's illicit control on MBA courses
MBA, MCA courses no longer under AICTE
2012 : DNA National B-School Survey 2012
Ranked 1st in International Exposure (ahead of all the IIMs)
Ranked 6th Overall

Zee Business Best B-School Survey 2012
Prof. Arindam Chaudhuri’s Session at IMA Indore
IIPM IN FINANCIAL TIMES, UK. FEATURE OF THE WEEK
IIPM strong hold on Placement : 10000 Students Placed in last 5 year
IIPM’s Management Consulting Arm-Planman Consulting
Professor Arindam Chaudhuri – A Man For The Society….
IIPM: Indian Institute of Planning and Management
IIPM makes business education truly global
Management Guru Arindam Chaudhuri
Rajita Chaudhuri-The New Age Woman
IIPM B-School Facebook Page

IIPM Global Exposure
IIPM Best B School India
IIPM B-School Detail

IIPM Links
IIPM : The B-School with a Human Face

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 
 
Global trading has been a way of life for hundreds, if not thousands of years, but it is only recently that the environmental and social implications of global sourcing decisions are being taken more seriously
 
Global trading has been a way of life for hundreds, if not thousands of years, documented by legendary tales like the travels of the explorer Marco Polo or the Silk Road, one of the world’s oldest and historically important trade routes. However, the scale and pace of change of global trade has changed dramatically in the last half century. Figures from the World Trade Organisation (WTO) show that since 1950, world trade in manufactured products has increased 50-fold, reaching a total of $10,500 billion in 2008. If commodities such as fuels, minerals and agricultural products are included, the total trade figure exceeds $15,000 billion.

Trends in global trading are the result of independent decisions taken by businesses around the world looking for sources of competitive advantage. However, these decisions have consequences, not just hidden costs but sustainability implications, which are often unaccounted for. A recent study conducted by Cranfield aimed to address this problem by looking at how companies make global sourcing decisions and how they analyse the costs, risks and sustainability implications of such decisions. The study included 15 case studies from seven different industries which included: retail, electronics, aerospace, fashion, mechanical equipment, oil & gas. The case studies allowed us to look in-depth at the processes used by organisations when conducting sourcing decisions, and allowed a comparison of the practices in different industries to be made.

It was clear from the research that in most cases the primary motivation for global sourcing was to reduce costs by relocating production to low labour cost countries. However, the definition of ‘cost’ was somewhat limited – often only including the purchase price, transportation and customs duties. The use of the ‘Total Cost of Ownership’ (TCO) concept whereby all supply chain costs, risk costs and transaction costs are included was conspicuous by its absence. Even more evident was the lack of consideration of the impact that global sourcing might have on greenhouse gas emissions and on social issues such as child labour, working conditions and living wages. This blinkered and short-term view is also at odds with the concept of sustainability which is defined as the ability to meet the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.

It is almost always the case that global sourcing will result in longer pipelines than the local or regional equivalent. Apart from the cost of financing the additional inventory that extended pipelines require, the likelihood of disruptions to the flow is increased. It is paradoxical that in an era of ‘just-in-time’ the typical lead-times for re-ordering and replenishment of goods and materials have increased as a result of global sourcing. In light of this, it is perhaps surprising that the use of formal supply chain risk management procedures in the context of global sourcing decisions is not the norm. Our research identified that more often than not, the potential impact of sourcing decisions on supply chain continuity is not formally considered.

Growth in global trade and the associated increase in transportation is contributing to higher emissions of greenhouse gases, particularly carbon dioxide. Alarmingly few organisations participating in the study had a clear understanding of the environmental implications of their decisions. However, it was evident that awareness of environmental issues was increasing and that companies were putting more time and resources into understanding and managing the environmental impact of their operations
 
There is now a growing realisation that in the not-too-distant future, organisations and even individuals will probably have to pay for the carbon impact of their activities. For the business sector, this penalty may take the form of taxes, levies or the capping of allowable emissions under carbon trading regimes. These additional costs could bring the commercial viability of their operations into question. For any organisation, it is not just the carbon impact of its in-house activities that needs to be understood but rather the total carbon effect of its wider supply chain.

With the current trend to off-shore sourcing continuing rapidly, the implications for total carbon impact are significant. To understand the true carbon footprint of a supply chain for any product requires the ability to conduct a ‘through life’ analysis of the emissions generated from cradle to grave. What is the total environmental cost from raw material sourcing through manufacturing and distribution to consumption and disposal?

For more articles, Click on IIPM Article

Source : IIPM Editorial, 2013

An Initiative of IIPMMalay Chaudhuri and Arindam chaudhuri (Renowned Management Guru and Economist).

For More IIPM Info, Visit below mentioned Links

2012 : DNA National B-School Survey 2012
Ranked 1st in International Exposure (ahead of all the IIMs)
Ranked 6th Overall

Zee Business Best B-School Survey 2012
Prof. Arindam Chaudhuri’s Session at IMA Indore
IIPM IN FINANCIAL TIMES, UK. FEATURE OF THE WEEK
IIPM strong hold on Placement : 10000 Students Placed in last 5 year
IIPM’s Management Consulting Arm-Planman Consulting
Professor Arindam Chaudhuri – A Man For The Society….
IIPM: Indian Institute of Planning and Management
IIPM makes business education truly global
Management Guru Arindam Chaudhuri
Rajita Chaudhuri-The New Age Woman
IIPM B-School Facebook Page
IIPM Global Exposure
IIPM Best B School India
IIPM B-School Detail

IIPM Links
IIPM : The B-School with a Human Face
IIPM makes business education truly global
IIPM B-School Facebook Page
IIPM Global Exposure
Planman Technologies
IIPM B-School Detail
IIPM: Selection Process
IIPM: Research and Publications
IIPM MBA Institute India

IIPM Contact Info

IIPM History
IIPM Think Tank
IIPM Infrastructure
IIPM Info
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 
Picture
The Web 2.0 revolution promises to be just as important a driver of productivity growth as automation was in the 19th and 20th centuries
 
Corporate bureaucracies are on their way to extinction. A new organisational form is emerging that will break down walls and bring people together, and in doing so, capture new opportunities and develop innovative solutions.

This statement – repeated often as Web 2.0 evangelists preach that corporate adoption of social media tools will trigger an e-ruption of creativity, innovation and productivity at work – was actually made just over 40 years ago by Alvin Toffler in his groundbreaking book, Future Shock. In the intervening decades, one thought leader after another has made similar predictions.

Toffler’s forecasts – about how information technology would soon revolutionise knowledge management in organisation – never lived up to their hype in the 1970s or 80s. That, however, didn’t stop Jim Maxmin, CEO of Thorn EMI, from proclaiming at the end of the 1980s: “In the last decade, excellence in business meant doing one thing well. In the decade to come, you will have to do everything well, and do it everywhere. The image of the corporation as a pyramid is dead. The new corporation will be more like a hologram, with shared information making each person, each part, contain the whole.”

The future has finally arrived. What’s different this time around is that a broader consensus seems to be forming. Web technology has crossed a tipping point and is now truly global and on the verge of becoming accessible to all. What’s more, companies are finally beginning to realise this: following initial foot-dragging, many are now actively embracing Web 2.0 tools. In a recent McKinsey survey, more than two-thirds of respondents admitted to using social media tools in their companies. The revolution, it seems, is finally happening. But revolutions can be as disruptive as they are empowering. To quote Tapscott from Wikinomics: “The new participation (brought about by Web 2.0 adoption) will also cause great upheaval, dislocation and danger for societies, corporations and individuals that fail to keep up with the relentless change.” Clearly, if the e-revolution is indeed happening, then executives urgently need to rethink how they structure, organise and manage their companies. Their success in doing so will determine whether their companies ride the crest of the revolution or are swept away by it.

Towards the Networked Enterprise
The broad adoption of social media tools has the potential to unleash a huge transformation in the way companies operate, resulting in a wide range of benefits including enhanced collective knowledge and greater innovation. Following are four key ways in which Web 2.0 tools are transforming organisations.

Increased collaboration: In its report, McKinsey found that when companies incorporate social media across the organisation, “information is shared more readily and less hierarchically, collaboration across silos is more common, and tasks are more often tackled in a project-based fashion.” This should not come as a surprise. One of the major benefits of the networked structure is that it increases information sharing within-and-among disparate departments and divisions.

A democracy of talents: Deployed across organisations, Web 2.0 software constructs open-ended platforms on which, in theory, everyone is equal. Employees working in such a setting are much more likely to openly share ideas and information exclusively for the benefit of the organisation as a whole – something that is rare in hierarchical organisations.
 
A culture of trust: With the rise of Web 2.0-enabled corporations, workers at all levels of the organisation have a much greater say in the day-to-day running of the company, while also enjoying the benefits of a culture of transparency. This, in turn, engenders stronger feelings of loyalty and trust amongst employees. Sadly, many companies still seem to have an instinctive fear of social media in the workplace. In a 2011 study by Robert Half Technology, more than one out of three CIOs surveyed said that their firms did not allow employees to use social networking sites such as Facebook or Twitter. Some employees are even getting sacked when caught logging onto social networking sites at work. Such blind resistance to social media adoption – while understandable – is not only counterproductive, but also highly risky.

Potential productivity gains: While many companies view social media as a ‘time sink’, the reality is that tools such as blogs, wikis and RSS feeds offer the potential to significantly increase productivity – as was shown by two separate studies by MindLab and the University of Melbourne. The latter research found that productivity increases 9% among employees who are able to access the Internet for fun during work. Ironically, the managers who dismiss MySpace, Twitter and Facebook as a waste of time are frequently the same people who themselves waste valuable time with pointless meetings. Even in the face of such widespread disapproval, employees in most organisations are still managing to regularly access their favourite social networking sites; if they can’t log on via their computer, they will simply connect through their smartphones. A recent study found that 76% of respondents visited Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter at least once a day. What’s more, much of this social networking activity was work-focused, with many employees reportedly using their social networks to showcase their companies, which builds brand recognition and supports organisational goals, from recruiting to sales. All of which begs the question: if social networks can be deployed for a company’s greater benefit, why isn’t everyone rushing to e-mpower their employees?

For more articles, Click on IIPM Article

Source : IIPM Editorial, 2013

An Initiative of IIPMMalay Chaudhuri and Arindam chaudhuri (Renowned Management Guru and Economist).

For More IIPM Info, Visit below mentioned Links

2012 : DNA National B-School Survey 2012
Ranked 1st in International Exposure (ahead of all the IIMs)
Ranked 6th Overall

Zee Business Best B-School Survey 2012
Prof. Arindam Chaudhuri’s Session at IMA Indore
IIPM IN FINANCIAL TIMES, UK. FEATURE OF THE WEEK
IIPM strong hold on Placement : 10000 Students Placed in last 5 year
IIPM’s Management Consulting Arm-Planman Consulting
Professor Arindam Chaudhuri – A Man For The Society….
IIPM: Indian Institute of Planning and Management
IIPM makes business education truly global
Management Guru Arindam Chaudhuri
Rajita Chaudhuri-The New Age Woman
IIPM B-School Facebook Page
IIPM Global Exposure
IIPM Best B School India
IIPM B-School Detail

IIPM Links
IIPM : The B-School with a Human Face
IIPM makes business education truly global
IIPM B-School Facebook Page
IIPM Global Exposure
Planman Technologies
IIPM B-School Detail
IIPM: Selection Process
IIPM: Research and Publications
IIPM MBA Institute India

IIPM Contact Info

IIPM History
IIPM Think Tank
IIPM Infrastructure
IIPM Info
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 
 
Picture
For some time now, concerned consumers and ad-watchers have been getting increasingly worried about the frat crossing boundaries and hitting erogenous zones where even angels (should, but no longer?) fear to tread! Holding up the Lux Cozy and Amul Macho ads as earlier examples apart from the tons of sexist deodorant ads and of course the scores of whitening creams, they continue to remain anxious, often protesting vehemently against the way the Persuasion Industry is trying to seduce the impressionable, unguarded and aspirational sections of our mahaan Bharat into promising them a more fulfilling, confident and rewarding life if they embrace the products advertised. In its effort to keep pace with India’s ever changing profile and fashionable definition of an ancient civilisation, which is also a young and modern nation, are the ad guys getting a bit too carried away and overdoing it by adventurously crossing the Lakshman Rekha and touching areas best left untouched? Or are we, due to traditional conditioning, being a little too touchy and forgetting that this is year 2012, and the blitz and exposure of new-age media to a techno-savvy youngistan renders this a non-issue?

A new TVC along the skin-lightening-product segment for a product called Clean & Dry Intimate Wash even promises Indian women protection, freshness (and most importantly) fairness “down there”! The commercial shows a young couple relaxing in their house. The man is shown reading a newspaper while the attractive wife – or whoever! – pouts, unhappy at being ignored. Reason? Her dark-coloured privates! Providence steps in, in the form of Clean & Dry Intimate Wash, ostensibly whitening the parts that seemed to have earlier cast a shadow over the guy’s inner view of the young lady and bingo, suddenly aal izz well! Pout disappears, break-up averted, newspaper flung aside to (undoubtedly) explore and enjoy some real whitening-strikes moments!

There’re too many questions that hit one when such an advertising hits the ceiling. Where do we stand on such in-the-face ads? Isn’t there an LoC that the product’s positioning is crossing? But then, how is such a product expected to be launched or marketed? One possibly cannot expect a simple word-of-mouth campaign, can one? And if the product is legal, then why have any hassles on the marketing of such a product? Are we going through the same wave of astonishment that one saw years ago when condoms were marketed in a savvy manner by Kamasutra as opposed to the politically correct yet moribund manner in which Nirodh was advertised?

When invited to comment, political journalist Mahua Chatterjee admits she’s tempted “to laugh hysterically so that she may not weep!” She soon gets serious and unleashes a series of posers. “Who are these guys creating these ads or manufacturing these products? Clearly a lot of us are totally disconnected from their radar! Is this their professional version of marketing which decrees: find a gap and fill it? In their drive to sell a product, is nothing sacred, safe or out of bounds? In the crazed rush to grab eyeballs, is titillation of any kind permissible? What about social responsibility, good taste, style & class?” questions Mahua. Then, tongue-in-cheek, the journo enquires why despite a zillion face-whitening products for men “nothing like Intimate Wash has been dedicated to their, er, penile space?”
 
Actress Moon Moon Sen, after a hearty laugh, offers discrete perspectives. “Sometimes, some ads – even if uncomfortable – are necessary. We live in a society where women (mothers & daughters) don’t always know about a lot of stuff, and doctors or professionals who do, hesitate to communicate these facts, due to mental conditioning, rendering them taboo. Unfortunately, many of these are necessary for a woman’s well-being. However, a vaginal whitening cream doesn’t remotely come in that category and does strain the imagination! A douche or cream for infection is understandable but...”

While documentary filmmaker Ishani Dutta finds the ‘intent’ of the TVC “inappropriate and sexist”, 23-year-old copywriter Tanu Koundal can’t stop laughing! “It’s too funny... I know that India is very whiteness crazed and men prefer fair complexioned wives, but it’s the face and body on display that is seen and reacted upon... not the private parts!” says Tanu. But the young lady also believes that this kind of advertising – edgy, weird and hitting no-man’s-land – is a part and parcel of today’s permissive, sexually-cool society where nothing is a big deal anymore. But isn’t the product strengthening the unfortunate fairness orientation of Indians and fortifying racist paradigms?

For more articles, Click on IIPM Article

Source : IIPM Editorial, 2013

An Initiative of IIPMMalay Chaudhuri and Arindam chaudhuri (Renowned Management Guru and Economist).

For More IIPM Info, Visit below mentioned Links

2012 : DNA National B-School Survey 2012
Ranked 1st in International Exposure (ahead of all the IIMs)
Ranked 6th Overall

Zee Business Best B-School Survey 2012
Prof. Arindam Chaudhuri’s Session at IMA Indore
IIPM IN FINANCIAL TIMES, UK. FEATURE OF THE WEEK
IIPM strong hold on Placement : 10000 Students Placed in last 5 year
IIPM’s Management Consulting Arm-Planman Consulting
Professor Arindam Chaudhuri – A Man For The Society….
IIPM: Indian Institute of Planning and Management
IIPM makes business education truly global
Management Guru Arindam Chaudhuri
Rajita Chaudhuri-The New Age Woman
IIPM B-School Facebook Page
IIPM Global Exposure
IIPM Best B School India
IIPM B-School Detail

IIPM Links
IIPM : The B-School with a Human Face
IIPM makes business education truly global
IIPM B-School Facebook Page
IIPM Global Exposure
Planman Technologies
IIPM B-School Detail
IIPM: Selection Process
IIPM: Research and Publications
IIPM MBA Institute India

IIPM Contact Info

IIPM History
IIPM Think Tank
IIPM Infrastructure
IIPM Info
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 
 
Rohit Ohri, Executive Director, Dentsu India Group talks to 4Ps B&M about how he plans to make the company’s work culture more creative and lively
 
When Rohit Ohri joined Dentsu India, he instantly realised that changing the fortune of the company was not going to be a cakewalk. However, by setting a priority-led plan, he’s been able to fulfil most of the tasks he set out to accomplish in the first year. We find out what he has in mind for the future.

Profit margins are going down tremendously in the industry. How are you tackling it?
While it is true that there is a lot of squeeze in the revenues of the agencies, what actually confronts the agencies, and this is a question for every agency in the market, is looking at broadening your scope of services. It’s not about what you were doing or the services you have been providing, but what you really need to see is where the consumer is going tomorrow and what services and connections can we have with the consumer tomorrow. That is why I say that mobile is the next big thing. If we were to look at mobiles as they are right now, then we would say that there is no revenue in it and you should junk it. But we need to be forward facing. What is important is understanding where the consumer is going and be there ahead of everybody else. This way, the clients, seeing that the agency is able to foresee the future trends of communication would find a reason to partner with us.

So the way forward is to find newer ways of servicing clients and hence generating revenues, rather than sticking with what you have and then cribbing about losing revenues.

The ad industry is known for its high attrition rates and critical shortage of talent. How do you plan to deal with it at Dentsu?
If we look at more proactive ways of looking at a talent, and even before the talent begins to think that he is stagnating or that he is doing his best, you give him another opportunity or you give him a new business to handle so that you can keep a constant sense of growth in that talent’s life and the way he is looking at his career. Everyone we have here with us has a vision of where they see their career growing and the organisation must be able to shake hands with that, because if the organisation is providing you the opportunity to actually do what will help your career grow, it is the fundamental reason why a talent stays with an organisation. Otherwise, people tend to move on because the organisation is not fulfilling their aspirations.

Being a Japanese entity, how beneficial or challenging has it been when it comes to roping in new clients as well as sustaining previous ones?
If you look at it, a Japanese entity runs in the front in almost all categories today, be it be automotives or electronics. And that has been a huge advantage for us as it really helped us build a base as a group in India. The other thing is the way advertising is really developing with the coming in of new age technology, and this new technology needs to be integrated with communications as the mobile media and the digital media are not traditional or non-traditional communication mediums. Nowadays, it’s not online or offline but rather through the line and it’s more of integrated communication. And this is something in which Japan is way ahead of the others and to my mind, this is a great opportunity for us to look at this next paradigm of communication and bring in the learnings from Tokyo to India.
 
When you joined Dentsu last year, what key problems was the agency suffering from in your view?
As an agency, the big challenge we have is to not be known in the market as a Japanese agency. We are owned by a Japanese MNC, but the fact is that in India, we want to be known as the agency with the best skills and capabilities in the market. We want to build an agency, which is as competitive and capable as the best there is in the industry. It’s not about working with Dentsu because you have the comfort zone of it being a Japanese agency. We need to be competitive in the industry and for that, we need the best people, the best skills and the best capabilities. We are actively identifying ways to change the game on every parameter and on every service delivery that we make to the client.

What do you feel is better for an advertising agency – a structured, orderly setup or a free flowing casual environment?
We are in the business of creating ideas and what we produce comes out of the mind, so to my understanding, whether the agency is organised or not is not of as much importance as whether the agency is creative. That, to me, is the most important thing. The creative culture to me is something, which not just the creative guys; but also the planning people, the account managers and every single person of the organisation are aware of and feel empowered by. That is what I have been trying to create over here. I don’t want to create a bank where people come on time and leave on time, I want to create an agency where good creative work can be done.

For more articles, Click on IIPM Article

Source : IIPM Editorial, 2013

An Initiative of IIPMMalay Chaudhuri and Arindam chaudhuri (Renowned Management Guru and Economist).

For More IIPM Info, Visit below mentioned Links

2012 : DNA National B-School Survey 2012
Ranked 1st in International Exposure (ahead of all the IIMs)
Ranked 6th Overall

Zee Business Best B-School Survey 2012
Prof. Arindam Chaudhuri’s Session at IMA Indore
IIPM IN FINANCIAL TIMES, UK. FEATURE OF THE WEEK
IIPM strong hold on Placement : 10000 Students Placed in last 5 year
IIPM’s Management Consulting Arm-Planman Consulting
Professor Arindam Chaudhuri – A Man For The Society….
IIPM: Indian Institute of Planning and Management
IIPM makes business education truly global
Management Guru Arindam Chaudhuri
Rajita Chaudhuri-The New Age Woman
IIPM B-School Facebook Page
IIPM Global Exposure
IIPM Best B School India
IIPM B-School Detail

IIPM Links
IIPM : The B-School with a Human Face
IIPM – FLP (Flexi Learning Program)
IIPM : The B-School with a Human Face
IIPM makes business education truly global
IIPM B-School Facebook Page
IIPM Global Exposure
Planman Technologies
IIPM B-School Detail
IIPM: Selection Process
IIPM: Research and Publications
IIPM MBA Institute India

IIPM Contact Info

IIPM History
IIPM Think Tank
IIPM Infrastructure
IIPM Info
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 
Hiroshi Omata, COO, Dentsu Marcom

How do you plan to tackle the attrition challenge in India?
Japan is still practising lifetime employment. But it is very different in India. Here, people just come and go. And while it is easy for me to say that I want to stop this trend, it’s actually very difficult to do so. But if I am to do it, then I would give them a lot of opportunities. In the same company, if they can have totally new experiences, then they might want to change their mind & stay on.

How has Sandeep Goyal’s departure affected the agency?
Mr. Goyal created the foundation of Dentsu in India from nothing. I respect him a lot for what he’s done. Without his effort, we would be nothing. What we are doing now is to create on top of that foundation. If I were to start from scratch, it wouldn’t have been easy.

What is better for the growth of an agency’s operation – competition or cooperation?
In the three companies we operate, we have collaboration as well as competition. Obviously, we have competing brands with each of these agencies, so there is a need to have a sense of secrecy and privacy between these companies. But we do also have collaboration between ourselves in the sense that we share the global trends and observations with each other.

For more articles, Click on IIPM Article

Source : IIPM Editorial, 2013

An Initiative of IIPMMalay Chaudhuri and Arindam chaudhuri (Renowned Management Guru and Economist).

For More IIPM Info, Visit below mentioned Links

2012 : DNA National B-School Survey 2012
Ranked 1st in International Exposure (ahead of all the IIMs)
Ranked 6th Overall

Zee Business Best B-School Survey 2012
Prof. Arindam Chaudhuri’s Session at IMA Indore
IIPM IN FINANCIAL TIMES, UK. FEATURE OF THE WEEK
IIPM strong hold on Placement : 10000 Students Placed in last 5 year
IIPM’s Management Consulting Arm-Planman Consulting
Professor Arindam Chaudhuri – A Man For The Society….
IIPM: Indian Institute of Planning and Management
IIPM makes business education truly global
Management Guru Arindam Chaudhuri
Rajita Chaudhuri-The New Age Woman
IIPM B-School Facebook Page
IIPM Global Exposure
IIPM Best B School India
IIPM B-School Detail

IIPM Links
IIPM : The B-School with a Human Face
IIPM – FLP (Flexi Learning Program)
IIPM : The B-School with a Human Face
IIPM makes business education truly global
IIPM B-School Facebook Page
IIPM Global Exposure
Planman Technologies
IIPM B-School Detail
IIPM: Selection Process
IIPM: Research and Publications
IIPM MBA Institute India

IIPM Contact Info

IIPM History
IIPM Think Tank
IIPM Infrastructure
IIPM Info
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 
Having undergone a complete overhaul over the last year, the agency is treading new grounds on its big leap ahead; 4Ps B&M gets the inside dope
 
In January last year, when Dentsu Global decided to buy off Sandeep Goyal’s stake in their three advertising companies for a reported sum of Rs.240 crore, it expectedly took adville by storm. To this day, the deal remains one of the biggest stake sales in the advertising industry. And as many industry veterans called the deal highly overpriced, they were also voicing in the same breath that Dentsu had become what it had on the back of Sandeep Goyal only. With an investment of roughly Rs.10 crore from each founder in 2003, the agency reported revenues of Rs.200 crore in the first year of operation itself, which, by the end of 2010, grew to Rs.1,200 crore. So naturally, the exit of Sandeep Goyal could not have been an easy one. Add to that, the agency saw the subsequent & sudden departure of several top management members, creating a huge leadership crisis. But this wasn’t the only setback that the company suffered back then. The buzz within the industry that Dentsu Marcom was losing its creativity was getting stronger. It was possibly for these reasons that many of the existing clients of the agency either put their business open for alternative pitches or did not give them any new brands. With such monumental problems at hand, finding a successor to Sandeep Goyal could not have been an easy task.

However in June 2011, when Rohit Ohri acceded to the position, the ball of change began to roll. Soon after joining the organisation, Rohit quickly ascertained his priorities – to get the right people in the organisation and to enthuse creativity within the existing team. Between June 2011 and now, the agency has been on a hiring spree; both at the top and at the junior levels; having hired over 23 new people from a total of 63 employees, and there are plans to get more. Besides Rohit, the other senior executives including Titus Upputuru, the National Creative Director, Narayan Devanathan, the National Planning Head, Sunita Prakash, Vice President and Harjot Singh Narang, the Delhi Branch head, have all joined the organisation within the last one year, thus forming a completely new management team. However, what was a bigger challenge than forming a new team was the second priority – reinvigorating the creative environment in the organisation. But as the saying goes, when one door closes, another opens up. Something similar happened at Dentsu Marcom too. While the sudden departure of the senior management had left a crater within the agency, it also gave them the option to start afresh and to give the agency a whole new innings.

If you were to visit the agency, there’s little chance that you would be able to sense the turmoil the agency had been through over the past year. The office, done up all in white, has interesting stuff lying around including water guns (unloaded, thankfully), skytrooper masks and African idols. There’s music to add to the melee, with in-office cricket/football available for any employee up for the ask. Clearly, the bigger intent in all this has been to push forward the fun-element into the office environment. Of course, any agency plumping its creative front is expected to embrace a bohemian philosophy. But Dentsu is evidently paying more than lip service to this issue. One big plus from this effort has been that the newly hired top management bonds quite well. In the world of killing office politics, there’s quite some value in the previous statement.
 
Every morning, the three vertical heads, Narayan, Titus and Harjot, huddle up at one of the corner seating areas (note: never inside a cabin) to discuss the latest office affairs. Through this, not only can they easily update each other with the latest developments concerning the agency, but also can set the agenda for the day. For them, this informal chat session – coupled with home cooked food, they insist – is the perfect beginning to the day. It’s an example that they’re trying to set for each and every employee of the agency – about how to be motivated and excited about work, yet not lose the fun, trust and team work quotient.

Did we mention the ice cream vendor with his ‘thela’ whom we crossed paths with on the 10th floor? That’s the kind of impact that hits one in the agency. Every success is celebrated substantially and expansively too. The ice cream vendor, for instance, was part of festivities that were being held on the culmination of an extremely hectic work schedule spanning more than two months, during which period, many of the employees spent several days and nights consecutively in the office to meet some deadline or the other; a consequence of having landed seven crucial deals within a period of four months.

For more articles, Click on IIPM Article

Source : IIPM Editorial, 2013

An Initiative of IIPMMalay Chaudhuri and Arindam chaudhuri (Renowned Management Guru and Economist).

For More IIPM Info, Visit below mentioned Links

2012 : DNA National B-School Survey 2012
Ranked 1st in International Exposure (ahead of all the IIMs)
Ranked 6th Overall

Zee Business Best B-School Survey 2012
Prof. Arindam Chaudhuri’s Session at IMA Indore
IIPM IN FINANCIAL TIMES, UK. FEATURE OF THE WEEK
IIPM strong hold on Placement : 10000 Students Placed in last 5 year
IIPM’s Management Consulting Arm-Planman Consulting
Professor Arindam Chaudhuri – A Man For The Society….
IIPM: Indian Institute of Planning and Management
IIPM makes business education truly global
Management Guru Arindam Chaudhuri
Rajita Chaudhuri-The New Age Woman
IIPM B-School Facebook Page
IIPM Global Exposure
IIPM Best B School India
IIPM B-School Detail

IIPM Links
IIPM : The B-School with a Human Face
IIPM – FLP (Flexi Learning Program)
IIPM : The B-School with a Human Face
IIPM makes business education truly global
IIPM B-School Facebook Page
IIPM Global Exposure
Planman Technologies
IIPM B-School Detail
IIPM: Selection Process
IIPM: Research and Publications
IIPM MBA Institute India

IIPM Contact Info

IIPM History
IIPM Think Tank
IIPM Infrastructure
IIPM Info