Although annual enrolments in higher education have grown steadily at 6.3% over the last decade, the GER (Gross Enrolment Ratio is a statistical measure used by the United Nations to measure education index of a nation) in India still stands at 12.4%, way below the global average of 26% and pathetically low when compared to an average of 36.5% for developing countries. Even the Human Development Index for the year 2011 ranked India at 134, one of the lowest among the League of Nations. This clearly indicates that India requires more institutions to address the issue of accessibility, which is only possible if government encourages entrepreneurs to set up private colleges and universities.

The good news is that, according to a recent report (Private Universities in India: An Investment in National Development) by management consulting group Parthenona, private universities in the country have more than doubled in the last six years. While the country had 20 private universities prior to 2005, that figure surged to 107 last year. However, the bad news is that India still ranks one of the lowest in terms of number of universities per population. While US has nearly 2,500 universities for a population of about 313 million, India has a little over 350 universities catering to a population of 1.3 billion. Even Germany and UK have over 350 and 125 universities for a population of 80 million and 60 million respectively. Experts estimate that India needs 1,000 universities more and the higher education enrolment ratio to be increased by 20% in the next 10 years, to meet the challenges of country’s development.

This certainly compels the government to make room for non-governmental educational institutions to shoulder this responsibility while, at the same time, increasing its efforts to strengthen and empower the existing universities. And not just government, even educational institutions need to look inward and at the paradigm shifts happening all over the world. Apart from the fact that we are now looking at an increasingly multi-polar global environment and a shift from a single ideology, it is a foregone conclusion that leaders of tomorrow will need a radically different approach as compared to their predecessors. Hence, it is important for educational institutions to realise that they have a critical role to play in building these leaders, and to understand how they can fulfill their role responsibly, as it also links to their own long-term sustainability. Listed below are the “Power Private Universities” and “India’s 25 Most Promising Engineering Colleges” which are imparting high quality education in India. They are providing a professional learning environment that acts as a catalyst not only for the exponential growth of students, but for the country as well.

Methodology:
The Indian Council for Market Research (ICMR) conducted a perception survey to identify Power Private Universities. The survey was conducted amongst education consultants, industry experts and students. The respondents were asked to name and list a few upcoming universities in the country based on course contents, faculty, infrastructure, affiliations and accreditations awarded to them, brand equity and media visibility. Based on these responses, the final list of 15 Power Private Universities was generated.

Apart from Power Private Universities, a separate perception survey was conducted by ICMR amongst engineering students to identify 25 Most Promising Engineering Colleges. Faculty members of esteemed engineering colleges were also interviewed on the parameters of infrastructure, course content and R&D. An overall sample of 250 respondents were covered using a structured questionnaire through telephonic and email techniques. Then, based on the frequency of responses, a list of the 25 Most Promising Engineering Colleges was generated.
 
How did the idea of opening Probiking showrooms came into picture?
It was the idea of our MD Rajiv Bajaj. In India, a large portion of the market use motorcycle for commuting purpose and we were the first one to bring in the sporty motorcycle with the Pulsar. The Pulsar range gave the consumer a sporty way of commuting at a time when the high-end market was almost negligible but we believed that the future potential lied in terms of the bikes being used not only as a tool but also as a means of recreation. We always believed this kind of market will develop in the Indian market over the period of time and to cater to such differentiated and premium segment we needed a similar channel that gave birth to Probiking.

How do you differentiate between a normal Bajaj showroom and a Probiking showroom?
The Probiking showroom is not for normal commuters rather it is for the bikers. In short, it is the biker’s den. The entire design and concept revolves around biking. The user can experience the performance of the bike using the equipment that we have in the showrooms called the dynamometer. With this equipment in place the user can really test the limit of a machine which one can’t do on a normal road as it is too risky. Moreover, the user also gets a proper knowledge on the technology that is used in the products.

Dynamometer is the primary USP, what are the other factors that makes the Probiking showrooms stand out in the country?
Apart from the Dynamometer, the layout is done in such a way that bikes are fixed on the ceiling and there’s a section where the technology that goes into the product is properly displayed and explained to the consumer.

With Bajaj launching more products with Kawasaki, how will you tackle the competition from the Harley Davidsons and Ducatis?
In luxury bikes, brand matter a lot. Their brand is different, our brand is different. First of all, Harley operates in very different segment of the market which is completely leisure. In short, they have their own space, we have our own space.

For more articles, Click on IIPM Article.

Source : IIPM Editorial, 2010.

An Initiative of IIPM, Malay Chaudhuri and Arindam chaudhuri (Renowned Management Guru and Economist).

For More IIPM Info, Visit below mentioned IIPM articles.

IIPM B-School Detail
IIPM makes business education truly global
IIPM’s Management Consulting Arm - Planman Consulting
Arindam Chaudhuri (IIPM Dean) – ‘Every human being is a diamond’
Arindam Chaudhuri – Everything is not in our hands
Planman Technologies – IT Solutions at your finger tips
Planman Consulting
Arindam Chaudhuri's Portfolio - he is at his candid best by Society Magazine

IIPM ranked No 1 B-School in India
domain-b.com : IIPM ranked ahead of IIMs
IIPM: Management Education India
Prof. Rajita Chaudhuri's Website

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Times were when astrologists would be the subjects of tea party humour. Not any more perhaps. Meena Kapoor, CEO, Netway India disregards such presumptions in her firm’s drive forward in the mobile VAS arena... and she knows her future!
 
From running an astro portal, how did Netway India enter into the mobile VAS space?
Netway was started at the time of dot com bust in 1999-2000 and was into web and internet. Initially, we created websites for the UK market and looked primarily at the NRI market in astrology as a vertical. Then gradually, as the industry evolved, we moved into the technical vertical of mobile VAS in 2004.

In mobile VAS, Netway operates on a revenue sharing model with telecom operators that varies from 3-25% for services. How do you sustain in that case?
It certainly has an impact on us but it’s a volume game at the end of the day. The telecom operators face their own struggle now especially as prices have fallen and they have their own issues. I believe that if our ecosystem were a little more organised than what it is now, all the stakeholders will benefit from it.

But then, how do you innovate in your vertical?
We are lucky because there is nothing which we cannot have access to. We have one of the largest content library in the world and we constantly get a gamut whether it’s cricket, astrology, bollywood or politics.

Your core competency, well, is astrology! Is there any other vertical you wish to enter?
We are looking at two new verticals to enter into by next year. Wellness is one of them as there is a huge synergy between that and astrology. Moreover, we have done a lot of research in this area. We’re working on other verticals as well which are currently in the conceptualisation stage and we’ll share information about them when they’re ready.

So how are you planning to go about the wellness sector in terms of content development? Will you be looking for some tie ups?
No, we believe in developing and producing our own content right from the beginning because the moment you involve third party content, you end up losing control over certain things.

For more articles, Click on IIPM Article.

Source : IIPM Editorial, 2010.

An Initiative of IIPM, Malay Chaudhuri and Arindam chaudhuri (Renowned Management Guru and Economist).

For More IIPM Info, Visit below mentioned IIPM articles.

IIPM B-School Detail
IIPM makes business education truly global
IIPM’s Management Consulting Arm - Planman Consulting
Arindam Chaudhuri (IIPM Dean) – ‘Every human being is a diamond’
Arindam Chaudhuri – Everything is not in our hands
Planman Technologies – IT Solutions at your finger tips
Planman Consulting
Arindam Chaudhuri's Portfolio - he is at his candid best by Society Magazine

IIPM ranked No 1 B-School in India
domain-b.com : IIPM ranked ahead of IIMs
IIPM: Management Education India
Prof. Rajita Chaudhuri's Website


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FMCG behemoth P&G is facing acute backlash for the Pampers brand from consumers ever since it replaced its old diapers, Swaddlers and Cruisers with a 20% thinner and more absorbent technology. Since the launch of the new Pampers Dry Max in the US market, there have been severe accusations and claims that the new product causes rashes and skin problems in children. However, P&G refuses to accept that the problem of skin rashes and chemical burns has been caused by Dry Max. In fact, they are of the view that the new product is the best diaper innovation in the last 25 years by P&G and was launched only after extensive testing. Meanwhile, the US Consumer Product and Safety Commission (CPSC) sprung into action after recent suggestions that the new diapers should be recalled back and has launched an investigation into the matter. If proven, it is reported that the accusation could cause P&G a whopping $8 billion, and hits to the credibility of Pampers.

 
The veteran director and choreographer, Farah Khan highlights her love for kids, dance and future plans to 4Ps B&M
 
Your favorite dance style?
I love every part of dance; my life has been dedicated to dancing. However, my personal favourite among all of them is Indian classical dance.

Kids, you and dance… any connection among the three?
I love kids and in fact, my son loves to dance. He is a fabulous dancer. He wakes up everyday in the morning and dances to the tunes of trance.

Do you think kids have a future in reality shows?
Some kids are really bright with amazing talent; they certainly have a very bright future ahead. These shows provide a perfect platform to them.

What about your upcoming film?
My new film Tees Maar Khan is almost 50% done and would be releasing just before the eve of Christmas on December 24 this year.

Quite an amusing name and no Shahrukh?
My husband chose the name and even the star cast, Akshay is a good friend of mine and Katrina is a beautiful lady, she has all her curves at the right places. In short, she is an amazing lady.
 
Sanchit Verma

For more articles, Click on IIPM Article.

Source : IIPM Editorial, 2010.

An Initiative of IIPM, Malay Chaudhuri and Arindam chaudhuri (Renowned Management Guru and Economist).

For More IIPM Info, Visit below mentioned IIPM articles.

IIPM B-School Detail
IIPM makes business education truly global
IIPM’s Management Consulting Arm - Planman Consulting
Arindam Chaudhuri (IIPM Dean) – ‘Every human being is a diamond’
Arindam Chaudhuri – Everything is not in our hands
Planman Technologies – IT Solutions at your finger tips
Planman Consulting
Arindam Chaudhuri's Portfolio - he is at his candid best by Society Magazine

IIPM ranked No 1 B-School in India
domain-b.com : IIPM ranked ahead of IIMs
IIPM: Management Education India
Prof. Rajita Chaudhuri's Website

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Is the “Star” factor blitzing our Adbiz too? Are big names intimidating clients, wowing kids, unnerving rivals and threatening to hijack the agenda that defines the basic tenets of good advertising? Or is all that addition of glamour, excitement and interest a general indication of everything being ok? 4Ps B&M reaches out to the fraternity... and gets an overdose of answers
 
Piyush Pandey, Prasoon Joshi and Balki, are commonly perceived as the “Khans of Adland”. Then come the rest. The troika are celebrated across all constituencies and generally tagged as Big Daddies of creativity and talent in adland. At major ad-fests around the world, they are invited to grace juries or chair segments. This surely adds to their lustre. Question is – Is this lionising by one and all fair, justified and worthy? Is media, which is constantly looking at upping the ante regarding the chosen few to push the excitement, novelty and the USP factor, trivialising a profession that is after all, a business, like any other? Also, in the process, are loads of genuine talent being ignored and overlooked because they are not media-savvy? Or is it that the ad-land stars are actually worthy leaders deserving of their large shadows, enveloping their empires?

Ad and theatre personality Bharat Dabolkar, first of the block, believes that the “Personality Cult” syndrome is a good thing and in fact has existed in Adland forever. Says he, “Earlier on, there was Alyque Padamsee, Gerson and Sylvie D’ Conha, Kamlesh Pandey, Kersi Katrak, Frank Simoes, Mohammed Khan… they were known and acknowledged stars.” True, since those days, the media blare & blitz was considerably low on wattage, their glow, mostly, touched only the ad-driven fraternity. Alyque of course, due to his theatre activity, was a popular multi-dimensional figure. Dabolkar roots for it because he believes it adds glamour, excitement and buzz to the profession, as he says, “Charismatic individuals lend color and capture popular imagination, which acts as a magnet for youngsters to join the profession… and I can’t find a fault with that at all”.

For more articles, Click on IIPM Article.

Source : IIPM Editorial, 2010.

An Initiative of IIPM, Malay Chaudhuri and Arindam chaudhuri (Renowned Management Guru and Economist).

For More IIPM Info, Visit below mentioned IIPM articles.

IIPM B-School Detail
IIPM makes business education truly global
IIPM’s Management Consulting Arm - Planman Consulting
Arindam Chaudhuri (IIPM Dean) – ‘Every human being is a diamond’
Arindam Chaudhuri – Everything is not in our hands
Planman Technologies – IT Solutions at your finger tips
Planman Consulting
Arindam Chaudhuri's Portfolio - he is at his candid best by Society Magazine

IIPM ranked No 1 B-School in India
domain-b.com : IIPM ranked ahead of IIMs
IIPM: Management Education India
Prof. Rajita Chaudhuri's Website

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With their eye-catchy advertising campaigns, Indian banks are getting younger & trendier by each day. But it’s their rising focus on customers that has actually helped them grow leaps and bounds, says Manish K Pandey
 
I’ll be honest. The name of the book was (or rather, is) What Got You Here, Won’t Get You There! The title caught my slovenly disinterested eye during one of my decrepit jaunts through the American Library, and I lumbered down for a skeptical look. Though I was more impressed by the notary recognitions the book got when it was launched in 2007 (NYT/USA Today/BusinessWeek best seller, WSJ #1 business book, HBS Working Knowledge series member) than the claim that the author, Marshal Goldsmith, is the world’s best known CEO-coach (so what if Alan Mullaly consults him... bah!), the fact was that the book both discomforted and disconcerted me... Goldsmith peddles 20 (bad) habits why successful people don’t become more successful. The discomforting part was that I qualified on 15 of those bad habits. The disconcerting part was that I was not even successful. But the interesting part was that the book’s running philosophy propagated the idea that all those factors that might have been important previously for becoming successful, would not remain the same as time passes! Applied to our cover story, it meant that all those banks in India that had been basking in the glory of being the leaders during the mid-2000s, realised by the end of the decade that leadership was a fickle and infidel mistress, vanishing at the sight of a more attractive legion.
 
Banks, over time, realised the gospel of leadership (or failure) – which was that it didn’t matter even if you had an inferior product or service, if the consumer was convinced that your product/service was superior than the competitors’, you would get leadership. The power of marketing your brand was overwhelmingly unimpeachable, especially in banking. Try as you might to provide a better service, those were the banks that marketed better, that took away the Roman crown! And that’s what led us to the ICMR – 4Ps B&M India’s Best Marketed Banks Survey 2010, an answer to what went right and what went brilliantly ‘righter’.

 
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They never believed much in branding, yet, their relationship with customers didn’t go down. We question Jaspal Singh. Bindra, Group Executive Director, Standard Chartered, to know how
 
As an international bank of repute; Standard Chartered has set unprecedented benchmarks in the global banking arena, especially in Asia, Africa and Middle-East. Their focus on these regions has helped them move out of the global financial crisis unhurt. With a proven strategy in place, it’s really a small wonder that Standard Chartered has combined its global capability, deep local knowledge and creativity to outperform its competitors in India. But what is more intriguing is the contribution of the bank’s India operations to its income statement. As per records, India is now the second largest market for Standard Chartered Plc. in terms of profit before tax. With such a bonding existing between the bank and India, it has now added one more brick to the 150-years old relationship by launching the first ever IDR in the country. 4Ps B&M’s DEEPAK RANJAN PATRA and AVNEESH SINGH run into Jaspal Singh Bindra, Group Executive Director, Standard Chartered Bank and question him about the bank’s future plans for India…

While many of your peers witnessed a fall in both toplines and bottomlines during the global meltdown, you grew 38% CAGR in terms of the last 3 years’ profit before tax. What was the reason behind your success?
We were disciplined and never lost sight of the basics of doing banking. We stayed true to our unique culture. That’s why even during the recession, we never needed to take any sort of help from any government or financial authorities. We never even required any kind of debt from the market during that period.

The global banking industry is undergoing a phase of consolidation. Do you have any M&A plans?
We will definitely look for such opportunities as and when we get a chance. But I must say, we are not completely dependent on mergers and acquisitions for achieving the desired growth. We believe in organic growth for creating value for our shareholders.

For more articles, Click on IIPM Article.

Source : IIPM Editorial, 2010.

An Initiative of IIPM, Malay Chaudhuri and Arindam chaudhuri (Renowned Management Guru and Economist).

For More IIPM Info, Visit below mentioned IIPM articles.

IIPM B-School Detail
IIPM makes business education truly global
IIPM’s Management Consulting Arm - Planman Consulting
Arindam Chaudhuri (IIPM Dean) – ‘Every human being is a diamond’
Arindam Chaudhuri – Everything is not in our hands
Planman Technologies – IT Solutions at your finger tips
Planman Consulting
Arindam Chaudhuri's Portfolio - he is at his candid best by Society Magazine

IIPM ranked No 1 B-School in India
domain-b.com : IIPM ranked ahead of IIMs
IIPM: Management Education India
Prof. Rajita Chaudhuri's Website

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HSBC, despite having a legacy typically British, has gone the full mile in trying to become Indian. 4Ps B&M meets the Marketing Head, Maitri Kuma, to get insights
 
What does Hong Kong have to do with Shanghai in a bank’s name? Belonging to a group set up in 1865 by a Scotsman, HSBC fortunately kept up with the centuries and got into some of the best markets on the Commonwealth platter – including India. Maitri Kumar, Head of Marketing, HSBC India tells Deepak Ranjan Patra, what role did marketing play in their India success story, and what is it that makes the brand HSBC click with the Indian consumers.

How important a role has marketing and branding strategy played in the success story of HSBC in India?
Our marketing and branding strategy played a key role not only in India but across all countries we are present in. The HSBC brand was rated as the most valuable financial brand in the world with a valuation of $28.47 billion by Brand Finance’s Top 500 Global Financial Brands, 2010 survey. However, one of its most telling achievements was the strength it displayed when the banking industry was assaulted by the global meltdown in 2008. Much of the credit for this goes to HSBC’s strong brand identity encapsulated in its famous slogan ‘The world’s local bank’.

But how has that slogan helped you in pushing up HSBC as a brand in India?
As I said, brand HSBC showed immense strength when other brands in the banking arena, across the globe, faced a real hard time to keep up their image during the global meltdown in 2008. And we believe our slogan, ‘The world’s local bank,’ played a very critical role in the same. HSBC’s global expertise coupled with local relevance finds expression in that tagline. This has been the driving force behind HSBC’s communication worldwide. Backed by strong consumer insights and validations, the products and services from HSBC address the concerns, wants and requirements of all its customers. Also, by communication of the bank’s products and services like Global Premier, Cards, Alliances, Commercial Banking et al., we offered the consumer a ‘reason to believe’ in what we said at a larger brand level.

So what would you consider the key drivers for brand HSBC in India?
In India, one of the key drivers of the HSBC brand imagery is the fact that it ‘advises on basis of its international network of expertise’. This attribute among many others has gone a long way in giving HSBC the standing it has in India today, that of one of the leading financial services brands.
 
Of late, innovation and product differentiation has become key strategies in the financial services sector. How do you rate these services in your bank?
The past couple of years have been action-packed for HSBC. To start off, since HSBC prides itself in continuously innovating, it took its earlier position to a logical conclusion in 2008: ‘People value things differently. That’s why we offer different banking solutions.’ It is this insight that helps HSBC understand and appreciate the values that shape financial needs. With extensive advertising across airports and other media like outdoor, TV et al., the brand reinforces its commitment to offering customised banking solutions to its customers.

 
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The story of some socially relevant medical institutions, passionately engaged in offering holistic, world class and affordable healthcare infrastructure is doing the rounds now – but so is the skepticism around their social models!
 
Like social work, healthcare has often been described as a mission, not a trade. However, when one looks around, horror stories abound! Ironically, the most disturbing aspect of India’s development over the past two [post liberalization] decades has been the rise in inequality in all indicators of development and well-being – the pathetic state of health and nutrition being a prime example! Tragically, while the ‘corporate’ private sector in healthcare has boomed and India is being touted and sold successfully as a hot “medical tourism destination,” the access of the common man to basic healthcare facilities has become increasingly more difficult. Further, the trials and tribulations of hassled patients, along with their endless stories of wrong diagnosis, zillion tests and eye-popping bills hardly warrants repetition. In this dismal space, there are some glimmers of hope, of entrepreneurs who have set up healthcare facilities to reach those who have, till date, been deemed unreachable – the havenots!

A number of such initiatives have been started in India. Aravind Eye Care Centre is one of the most well known, made popular particularly by its prominent mention in the book on Fortune at the Bottom of the Pyramid by late Prof. C. K. Prahalad.

Of the next lot, Shramjeevi Hospital in Kolkata is a more recent example and one that has started earning its place in the sun. The hospital was also covered in our sister magazine The Sunday Indian. Shramjeevi was set up by former workers of the sick Indo-Japan Steel Company. It all started when these workers set up a free weekly medical check up for the poor. The exercise was an attempt to repay in kind the people, who had earlier helped them through the cycle of closure and reopening of the steel plant. With an initial capital of just Rs.40,000, they made beds, operation tables, trolleys, et al, using steel scrap. They used automobile headlights as OT lights and kept them lit with AC/DC and battery systems. In every aspect of their operations, the concept of frugality took up a whole new meaning. The hospital is based completely on donations, yet still focused exclusively on the underprivileged. The hospital provides heart care surgeries at just Rs.25,000, compared to Rs.1,00,000 at most other hospitals.

On the religious front, the Sathya Sai hospitals in South India (Puttapurthi, Whitefield, Bangalore) also offer highly subsidised yet world class healthcare services to all the needy. This hospital again is run by donations, which rich and devout donors willingly provide. “Despite the social aspect, the hospital has managed to rope in foreign and Indian doctors who voluntarily provide their services free of cost,” says A. Sundari, a hospital volunteer.