With The new ‘Change the game’ TVCs, Pepsi has Attempted to Attract its TG by showing some out of The Book Tricks. But between the lines, it’s The Practically Proven trick, Cricket that they have Banked Upon
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It seems as if cricket has once again started taking it head on with God in terms of omnipresence, at least in India. Amidst the chanting, Pepsi, the official sponsor of the ICC Cricket World Cup 2011, has unveiled a set of commercials reflecting the unorthodox face of modern cricket, thereby doing justice to their slogan, ‘Change the Game’. In one such ad, you can spot English batsman Kevin Pieterson, helping fruit vendors to put watermelons inside a vehicle, and in the process of learning a new trick – Alti palti, which he puts to use perfectly on the field in the form of reverse sweep. The creative flock behind this interesting TVC is from Taproot India comprising of Agnello Dias, Santosh Padhi, Kaushal Dhokker and Manan Mehta. Prasoon Pandey and Cyrus Pagdiwala of Corcoise Films were in charge of production.

Speaking on their expectations from the campaign, Sandeep Arora, Executive VP – Marketing (Cola), Pepsico India, says, “We expected the campaign to bring out the excitement and passion around the game of cricket during the World Cup. In addition to that, it ought to reflect Brand Pepsi’s distinct point of view on cricket and how it inspires the youth.” Once the brief was clearly stated to the creative agency, comments Agnello Dias, CCO, Taproot India, “It was quite simple to find the out of the box shots developed by popular cricketers. Pietersen was one of the more obvious choices.” Recollecting the memorable moments from the shoot, Dias shares, “The ad was shot in Film City and Pietersen was surprisingly enthusiastic about the idea and very co-operative despite the Film City heat. I remember him giving a ‘go Bangalore’ shout to an onlooker who was wearing a Royal Challengers jersey on the sidelines.” Advanced planning had been very useful to the team

The campaign idea evolved from the simple truth – that the game of cricket, as it began, was a lot different from the game that is played today. It’s time to celebrate the new, vibrant, dynamic face of the sport that is ruling this part of the world, rather than rue the demise of the traditional colonial game that was imported across our shores. The music has been composed by the trio of Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy and the catchy jingle ‘Alti-palti de ghuma ke,’ pivotal to the plot of the ad, was born during the jamming sessions between Prasoon Pandey and the musical trio. The idea was to make the words that relate to the shots and catchy to the public eye. Interestingly, the Hindi utterance ‘Samjhe samjhe’ with which Pietersen avers to the directions given by the locals before holding one watermelon, was not a part of the script initially. Apparently, quite a few things were decided on the shooting floor itself, and this was one such idea. Apart from Pieterson’s Alti-palti, the brand has also unveiled for other campaigns that have popularised Dhoni’s Helicoptor Shot, Sehwag’s Upar (Upper) cut, and Bhajji’s Doosra.

For more articles, Click on IIPM Article

Source : IIPM Editorial, 2011.

An Initiative of IIPM, Malay Chaudhuri and Arindam chaudhuri (Renowned Management Guru and Economist).

For More IIPM Info, Visit below mentioned IIPM articles.

IIPM ranked No 1 B-School in India
domain-b.com : IIPM ranked ahead of IIMs
IIPM: Management Education India
Prof. Rajita Chaudhuri's Website

IIPM Proves Its Mettle Once Again....
Arindam Chaudhuri on Internet.....
Arindam Chaudhuri: We need Hazare's leadership
Professor Arindam Chaudhuri - A Man For The Society....
IIPM: Indian Institute of Planning and Management

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India’s Favourite Small Car Manufacturer is the envy of a Bevy of Premium and Luxury Players. But now Maruti Seeks to get into The Luxury Segment itself with The Kizashi. Is it The Right way forward?
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Before the world could get a chance to see the unveiling of the world’s ‘cheapest’ car Tata Nano at the 9th Auto Expo in 2008, the Maruti Suzuki Pavilion attracted a lot of attention on a fine Wednesday afternoon. I was told that apparently, the company was showcasing the concept models of two cars along with other offerings in its portfolio. One concept model alluded to the A-Star. But without doubt, the audience and yours truly that day had their hearts set for the second concept car. The general buzz around was that this car was the Kizashi – Japanese for “a sign of great things to come.” Making its way to India from the Frankfurt Motor Show, where it was first showcased in November 2007 by Suzuki, the model has managed to gather some of the most ubiquitous praise and also critique globally. To put the test to rest and the mettle to the metal, Maruti finally launched the Kizashi in India in February this year.

It may be recalled that when Maruti showcased the production model of the Kizashi at the 10th Auto Expo in January 2010, many automobile experts questioned the ability of the company to take on rivals of the likes of Honda Accord and Toyota Corolla Altis. Now that the model is here in the country and positioned as a luxury sports sedan, it brings to the fore a question on the direction where Maruti Suzuki, the nation’s largest automaker, wishes to go towards, especially as neither Honda, nor Toyota or even the other competitors seem to be backing off one bit from the competitive arena.

My decision to analyse Kizashi’s marketing mix did not emanate from my personal orientation towards the Kizashi (well, I simply love the Kizashi), but from a combination of various other factors – starting from the paradoxical positioning (when Maruti made it clear at the launch itself that it was not aiming at huge volumes with Kizashi; but was rather working on making it a future-ready product) to the fact that the Kizashi might be just a tool to up-position Maruti’s brand profile, much like the ‘business class’ pitted against the ‘economy’ passengers. Yet, Shinzo Nakanishi, MD & CEO, Maruti Suzuki India, has from the start been quite affirmative in his strategic intent – “The Kizashi is a very important step forward for Maruti Suzuki. It will be for the top-end customers in the Indian market and we are fully geared up to delight the customers in a segment where we have been absent so far,” he had said during the launch. Still, the Kizashi issue is quite critical at this juncture for Maruti Suzuki, mainly because wishing away a considerable part of one’s marketing budget to promote a product that is not expected to give numbers, is quite a big ask. And my journey in the past few weeks within Maruti Suzuki’s various echelons of management only succeeded in throwing up more tactical paradigms.

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The market size for the luxury sedan market stands at 3% of the Indian automobile market (unit sales of 35,722 for the period of April 2010 to January 2011) as of today. Mayank Pareek, Managing Executive Officer – Marketing & Sales, Maruti Suzuki, knows these figures by heart. And when he talks to me, I can only sense growing confidence that the company has in the product, but always laced with the number issue. Even Mayank admits, “Kizashi will be a product for the future. We may not be able to fetch high volumes today, but we anticipate that there will be a demand for such a model in future.” Then again, the company is investing further into even remodelling its sales process for Kizashi, as it has already got dedicated sales personnel in place for the product, who have been trained especially to deal with the target customers of Kizashi. And this apart from the fact that the Kizashi is even being moderated to suit Indian conditions. I. V. Rao, Managing Executive Officer – Engineering and R&D, Maruti Suzuki, lets on to me, “Maruti has been so successful in the Indian market so far only because it has been able to provide consumers with products that they’ve always been looking for. We are confident that Kizashi will replicate the success.”

For more articles, Click on IIPM Article

Source : IIPM Editorial, 2011.

An Initiative of IIPM, Malay Chaudhuri and Arindam chaudhuri (Renowned Management Guru and Economist).

For More IIPM Info, Visit below mentioned IIPM articles.

IIPM ranked No 1 B-School in India
domain-b.com : IIPM ranked ahead of IIMs
IIPM: Management Education India
Prof. Rajita Chaudhuri's Website

IIPM Proves Its Mettle Once Again....
Arindam Chaudhuri on Internet.....
Arindam Chaudhuri: We need Hazare's leadership
Professor Arindam Chaudhuri - A Man For The Society....
IIPM: Indian Institute of Planning and Management

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4Ps B&M examines the strange paucity of ‘Love-Ads’ currently and exhorts, subjectively of course, the pundits to – well – get love back!
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The most revered, hymned and celebrated emotion in this world is alas, allocated [by the powers that are!] only one calendar day in the year: Valentine’s Day! And boy, is there an overdrive – across all markets – to hard-sell heart-sell! But look around and suddenly you’ll realise that there’s a strange paucity of ‘love communication’. In other words, ads today are harping about technological prowess, or pricing coups, or even off-the-zonker humour... where the hell did the cheesy love ads disappear to?

And that at a time when the nation is brimming with Don Juanistic fervour. Never in recorded history has there been such a titanic need, hunger and desire for love. Quickly translated, the market for love is… unimaginable! Hard-boiled cynics and myopic marketers may dismiss this line of thought but the savvy, intelligent, sensitive, emo-tracking communication dude gets the drift and taps, full-on, with thumper results! It’s not so hard to figure out why, really. Look around and you see this strange scene with human beings longing to invest in emotion, love, imagination and feelings, both in their life and work, but most of them have one major problem: They don’t have a clue! Declares Isha Khan, a Corporate Consultant, “They are caught flat-footed in the challenge of translating love into a palpable, tangible and credible action. Comprehensively and totally foxed at the task of dovetailing innovation speed and flexibility with the magic and mystique of bonding.” To grounded people (not totally consumed or corrupted by gross and crass materialism that surrounds us), the solution is simple: Get back to Basics. Junk those bulky reports. Dump those research studies. Give love a chance. Leverage this amazing emotion as a strategic device for an enduring emotional connect – with every member across your target group/constituency – and watch the bottomline soar!

Genuine, sensitive and smart communicators have always understood, recognised and leveraged this emotion intelligently to escape from the dreaded ‘commodity trap’ and place brands where they actually belong – at the emotional centric-stage. Confesses veteran behavioural scientist and communication-watcher Kishore Dave, “This is a hallowed space reserved for charismatic brands – Pepsi, Coke, Reebok, Nike, Apple, Fevicol, Vodafone, Airtel, Lux, Surf, HDFC, Samsung, Archies – which inspire a kind of passion and loyalty that are both off-limits and non-negotiable to the touts. Also, what better time than now – harsh, tough, cynical and complex – to bring back the past and get love back-on-track. Celebrate love as emotion, inspiration and motivation Number One! Reaffirm what smart ad guys and marketers have known all along... that in the endless battle lines between emotion and reason, the former leads to action; the latter, only to conclusion”.

For more articles, Click on IIPM Article

Source : IIPM Editorial, 2011.

An Initiative of IIPM, Malay Chaudhuri and Arindam chaudhuri (Renowned Management Guru and Economist).

For More IIPM Info, Visit below mentioned IIPM articles.

IIPM ranked No 1 B-School in India
domain-b.com : IIPM ranked ahead of IIMs
IIPM: Management Education India
Prof. Rajita Chaudhuri's Website

IIPM Proves Its Mettle Once Again....
Arindam Chaudhuri on Internet.....
Arindam Chaudhuri: We need Hazare's leadership
Professor Arindam Chaudhuri - A Man For The Society....
IIPM: Indian Institute of Planning and Management

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Rabindranath Tagore Memorial International Prize, Surama Chaudhuri Memorial International Award, Manavata Vikas Award... an array of prestigious prizes instituted by IIPM is set to alter the international awards landscape for good. Dr Malay Chaudhuri, Founder Director of IIPM, tells 4Ps B&M why the IIPM Awards are in a league of their own

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DR. MALAY CHAUDHURI
What is the rationale behind the IIPM Awards for excellence in the fields of literature, arts, journalism and social work?
These awards are a logical development for IIPM. In our very first prospectus – the year was 1973 – we spelt out that skill development would be a key element in our course content, but that it certainly would not be the only element. We stressed on two other dimensions – fostering a sense of commitment to society and active application of arts and literature to life. Commitment to society is essential in order to create economic parameters that favour the people at large. National economic planning should be a core pursuit. If planning is market-oriented, then it is skewed in favour of those who control resources. For us, management education has always had these three distinct dimensions. A sense of ethics should underline distribution. It is also imperative to develop appreciation of arts and literature. The IIPM Awards for excellence follow from our third commitment.

You have described the Rabindranath Tagore Memorial International Prize as a challenge to the Nobel Prize. In what sense is that the case?
This award has been instituted as a move to take away the West’s exclusive power to decide what is good in literature, art and peace efforts. The Nobel Prize for literature has not always gone to great writers. The Peace Prize has been, in recent times, given to people who have committed genocide. Therefore, the idea is to institute an award comparable with the Nobel as a public demonstration of our opposition to the Western monopoly on awards for excellence in various fields. I see a shift from the Atlantic to the Pacific. It is happening in economics and planning. Why shouldn’t it also happen in the domain of awards? Our effort is to push an initiative based on that superstructure. We want to decisively intervene in the process of deciding on awards. We want to demonstrate that we are equal players.

So far the focus of the IIPM Awards seems to have been on Bengali literature. Will you be looking at recognising other literatures in the coming years?
Our focus is on literature, not on literature in any particular language. It is only by accident that Bengali literature dominates. The presence of Rabindranath Tagore and the influence he had on numerous writers in Bengal led to an explosion of great literature. The literature produced in Bengali has been of a very high quality. The dominance of Bengali stems partly from our acquaintance with the language and partly from our perception that many Bengali writers are comparable with the best in the world. They should have won the Nobel Prize. They did not because the awards mechanism was loaded against writers like them.
 
So, will you be giving the IIPM Awards to writers in other languages as well in the years ahead?
Of course, we would, without any hesitation. We would be proud indeed to discover and honour exceptional literary talent in other languages. We would, of course, need help from friends and experts in identifying the best writers in these languages. Once we have the guidance we need and a proper assessment system is in place, you will see the IIPM Awards going to more and more non-Bengali litterateurs.

And will you honour international writers as well?
Don’t be surprised if next year we choose an American or European writer for the Tagore Award.

How are the award winners chosen?
We have a small committee. We are in constant touch with people who are well-read and are aware of literary developments. We seek their opinion. They give us guidance. I myself have been a voracious reader since childhood.

What is the logic behind the big prize money on offer with these awards?
The Nobel Prize for literature this year will fetch the winner 1.08 million euros. Last year, the amount was 1 million euros. We wanted to match that. Veteran Bengali writer Ramapada Chowdhury has won the first Rabindranath Tagore Memorial International Prize. The prize money is Rs.1 crore. This award will be handed over to the writer on May 9, 2011, Tagore’s 150th anniversary. To make a real impact, we wanted the prize money to be equivalent of the Nobel. A small amount would not have had the same effect. The Surama Chaudhuri Memorial International Award for Literature and Journalism is accompanied by an amount of $100,000. The first of this series of awards has been won by Afghan-origin writer Khaled Hosseini.

Are you satisfied with the general awareness about the IIPM Awards?
No, I am not. The importance of these awards has not been fully appreciated by the media. Either we do not have the kind of high quality media that we deserve or there is a deliberate conspiracy of silence. Take the case of the leading Bengali newspaper. The Surama Chaudhuri Memorial International Award, in monetary terms, is worth 80 times more than the annual award that this newspaper group gives but they do not want to share that information with their readers. They haven’t mentioned a word about Ramapada Chowdhury winning the Rabindranath Tagore Memorial International Prize although the publishing house owned by this media group has published most of the celebrated writer’s work. I can understand if they black out our awards. But why should they black out Ramapada Chowdhury? It is completely unacceptable.

There is obviously no award in India with this kind of prize money. How important is this for the profile of these awards?
Well, I do not believe that money alone can decide the worth of an award. An award acquires prestige if it is consistently given to deserving people. This prestige is built over time.

For more articles, Click on IIPM Article

Source : IIPM Editorial, 2011.

An Initiative of IIPM, Malay Chaudhuri and Arindam chaudhuri (Renowned Management Guru and Economist).

For More IIPM Info, Visit below mentioned IIPM articles.

IIPM ranked No 1 B-School in India
domain-b.com : IIPM ranked ahead of IIMs
IIPM: Management Education India
Prof. Rajita Chaudhuri's Website

IIPM Proves Its Mettle Once Again....
Arindam Chaudhuri on Internet.....
Arindam Chaudhuri: We need Hazare's leadership
Professor Arindam Chaudhuri - A Man For The Society....
IIPM: Indian Institute of Planning and Management

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